Courses

Arts

Visual Arts

Visual Art 8

Are you looking to have fun, experiment with new materials, and have more control over your artistic creations? Art 8 is an exciting introductory course designed for grade 8 students looking to explore and experiment with a wide range of media. Students will learn and practice drawing, painting, printmaking, mixed media, and sculptural techniques through mini “bootcamps”, blog work, sketchbook exercises, and projects. Students will gain a better understanding of the elements and principles of design while taking ownership of their own learning and letting their curiosity and independent ideas guide them to create authentic works of art. The primary goal of Art 8 is for students to enjoy the process of creating, foster curiosity, and creative thinking, and strengthen their confidence in personal expression. All Newcomers welcome!

Prerequisite: No prerequisite although most students have taken art 6 & 7

Visual Art 9

Discover your inner creativity, and have the most incredible time learning about the wonderful world of Art and all it has to offer. Visual Art 9 encourages students to create authentic art that is student directed, expressive and personally meaningful. This course gives students the opportunity to explore and develop their creative problem skills through the exploration of a wide variety of media, which includes Drawing, Painting, Printmaking, Collage, Ceramics/Sculpture, and Mixed Media. Students will gain strength and confidence as they further explore and develop the skills and techniques leant in Visual Art 8. Through mini “bootcamps”, Blog work, sketchbook exercises, and Big Idea projects students will be inspired to let their ideas and curiosity guide their learning. This course will leave students with the knowledge and basic skill requirements needed to continue their studies in the Visual Arts.

Prerequisite: No prerequisite although previous art experience will be advantageous.

Filmmaking 1 (Open to students in Grade 10-12)

In Filmmaking 1 students will understand the basic principles of filmmaking, develop skills in the construction of a narrative screenplay as well as develop skills in planning, shooting and editing a short film. Essentially, if you want to learn how to tell a great story through video and sound, this is the course for you. In order to make quality short films, students will be given instruction and opportunity to harness their abilities to think critically and analytically about film, how to create original screenplays and the creative process involved in conceptualizing an original film. We will be using a variety of cameras and lenses. Students will also be expected to view some short and feature length films throughout the year to analyze and pull creative inspiration from.

Prerequisites: NONE


Photo & Design 1 (Open to Students in Grade 10-12)

This course will unite the two powerful art forms of Digital Photography and Graphic Design into one super-course. We will learn about professional Digital SLR cameras, Cintiq Tablets, Ipad Pro’s, Adobe Illustrator and Adobe Photoshop. Students will learn how to create logos and movie posters as well as exploring editing software within Adobe Photoshop and creating illustrations and professional looking typography through Adobe illustrator. Students will also be introduced to using studio lighting and remote flash equipment which allow them to shape and mould their photographic subjects to a very professional and visually stunning level. No Prerequisite is required but an open mind to new ways of thinking and creating is a must!

Although students will learn many concrete skills and techniques within this course, a huge emphasis in the course will be on student creativity and opportunities to go off in new and innovative directions with their photographic and graphic design based art.

Prerequisites: NONE


AP Art History 12

Whether you are looking to be a more confident art museum visitor, looking to explore the diversity of human history through the eyes of art, or simply seeking to inspire your own creativity, AP Art History 12 is likely the course for you! AP Art History 12, an elective academic course open to students in Grades 11 and 12, is a challenging, university-level course, which enables students regardless of their level of experience in art, to develop skills in appreciating artwork, with an emphasis on visual analysis. Students will acquire tools to allow them to be conversant about works of art they encounter for the rest of their lives by mastering how to approach a work of art, the vocabulary and analytical methods with which to discuss it, and the knowledge of how it fits into the general sweep of art historical periods, cultures, and styles. The study of art history aids students in making connections between a variety of disciplines, as it enhances their understanding of politics, literature, philosophy, science, religion, and culture. AP Art History helps students to appreciate art and architecture from around the world (a great set of skills to have for future world travels!). By giving “voice” to works from lesser- known artists and from unfamiliar cultures, this course aims to develop as broad as possible a perspective about and appreciation for the art and architecture from European-based cultures (or the “Western Canon”) as well as art and architecture beyond the European tradition. Ultimately, students will walk away not only feeling well-prepared for the AP Art History Exam, but will have an increased individual appreciation – and perhaps even a passion – for the visual arts and its place in society.

Prerequisite: This course is open to all students in grades 11 and 12 and no prior study of art history is required. However, the Introduction to Art History 10/11 course is suggested as a solid foundation for AP Art History. Sound writing and critical-thinking skills are strongly recommended.

Visual Arts Senior - Level 1

Are you ready to push yourself creatively and to begin exploring the full menu of what visual arts can offer? This is a course for those students continuing on from Visual Art 9, or who are taking their first Studio Art course at the senior level. In this course, students will develop both an understanding of and an appreciation for how the many different art mediums and digital technologies can complement each other in making truly powerful and thought provoking art. This course is designed to help students learn how to think like an artist and to create work using “big ideas” and a large variety of materials. The concept, rather than the final product, will often be the starting point, and students are expected to take ownership of their own learning, letting their ideas and curiosity guide their artistic practice. In this course, each unit will start with a “Big Idea” to explore followed by a series of mini lessons or “Boot Camp” demonstrations where various processes and procedures are taught. Students will be enabled to further their curiosity in exploring the “Big Ideas” through more flexibility of choice. In designing their own projects, students will be able to explore a variety of artistic materials and processes using both traditional and digital technology. Developing and refining artistic skills through the use of a variety of 2-D and 3-D art materials and processes, understanding art in both a historical and contemporary context, and making connections from these to your own artwork will be explored through sketchbook work, short film documentaries, blog reflections, and larger studio projects.

*Students thinking they may want to pursue the AP Portfolio will be strongly advised to work at a faster pace, with emphasis placed on building a body of Quality work intended for their senior portfolio.

Visual Arts Senior - Level 2

Do you want to make authentic art that is student directed, expressive and personally meaningful? This course is for senior students who have successfully completed the Senior Art 1 course and want to continue exploring a variety of big ideas and art media/processes at a more advanced level. This course will focus on projects and learning that will prepare students for either the Senior Art 3 course or the final portfolio submission required in AP Studio Art 12. Senior Art 2 continues to build on the basic skills and methodologies of a variety of both traditional and non-traditional 2-D and 3-D media and processes covered in Senior Art 1 through “boot-camps”, reflective writing (ie. blogs), and larger self-driven studio projects. Students will continue to explore composition-building fundamentals such as line, volume, shape, texture, colour, composition, mark-making, etc. through painting, printmaking, sculpture, and digital media. Students will be challenged to create works where the concept or “Big Idea” continues to be the starting point, and students will be expected to take ownership of their own learning and let their curiosity and independent ideas guide them to create authentic works of art. As with the Senior Art 1 course, understanding art in both a historical and contemporary context, and making connections from these to one’s own artwork through sketchbook work, short film documentaries, blog reflections, and larger studio projects will be expected. Ultimately, Senior Art 2 will challenge students to create artwork that is of increased quality and depth to meet more rigorous senior level expectations.

*As with the Senior Art 1 course, students thinking they may want to pursue the AP Portfolio will be strongly advised to work at a faster pace, with increased Quality and Breadth, and where the emphasis is on continuing to build a body of work intended for their senior portfolio.

Visual Arts Senior - Level 3

This course is for senior students who have successfully completed the Senior Art 2 course and want to challenge themselves creatively, improving skills, learning new techniques, and building confidence in the studio. Senior Art 3 continues to build on the basic skills and methodologies of a variety of both traditional and non-traditional 2-D and 3-D media and processes covered in Senior Art 2 through “boot-camps”, reflective writing (ie. blogs), and larger self-driven studio projects. The units are designed to help students learn more about what it is to think like an artist and to create work that is personally meaningful, using “big ideas” and a variety of materials. The students are expected to take ownership of their own learning, letting their ideas and curiosity guide their practice. Students will further their curiosity, exploring the “Big Ideas” through more flexibility of choice in artistic materials and processes. Developing artistic skills through the use of a variety of art materials and processes, understanding art in both a historical and contemporary context, and making connections from these to your own artwork will be achieved through sketchbook work, blog reflections, and larger studio projects. Over the course of the year, students seeking a future in the visual arts will continue producing a portfolio of work for submission to post secondary art schools.

Filmmaking 2 (Open to students in Grade 11-12)

Filmmaking 2 is a continuation of Fundamentals of Filmmaking 10-12. This course is designed for students who are ready to delve into more complex aspects of film production, film analysis, sound design, screenwriting and directing. Emphasis will be placed on a writing, directing and producing several short films in small teams/crews with classmates as well as some solo work. A collaborative attitude is a must.

Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Filmmaking 10/11


Photo & Design 2 (Open to students in Grade 11-12)

This course aims to allow students to continue exploring the artistic possibilities of graphic design and photography. Through observation, discussion and creation of visual media we will be exploring the vast world that is Graphic Design and digital photo. This course is a continuation of the skills, concepts and artmaking that was introduced in Foundations of Photo & Design 10/11. Students are encouraged to explore a more personal approach to the creative process and to begin to develop media preferences and self-direction. There will be plenty of opportunity for students to creatively approach each assignment in their own personal direction which will allow students to develop their own personal style and creative process as they mature as young artists. Although the majority of the work in this course will be created in the studio, Students will occasionally be expected to do research, project building and sometimes assembly of projects outside of class time.

Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Photo & Design 10/11


AP Studio Art 12

If you looking to build a portfolio for art school or to challenge yourself to create a body of artwork exploring an independent idea or concept then AP Studio Art is for you. AP Studio Art builds on the portfolio work created in other art courses with the year focusing on the Concentration portion of the AP Studio Art portfolio. Students are required to submit an exam portfolio at the end of the course in either Drawing or 2D Design. This portfolio is then submitted to the College Board. Students will be expected to work outside of class time in order to create works of high quality and meet rigorous expectations.

The portfolio consists of three sections:

Breadth: 12 images including a variety of works demonstrating understanding of 2-D Design or Drawing issues

Concentration: 12 works describing an in-depth exploration of a particular 2-D Design or Drawing concern

Quality: 5 works demonstrating understanding of drawing or two-dimensional design in concept, composition, and execution

Yearbook 11

This course offers students the chance to learn about the exciting world of publishing while actually working on our school yearbook. Topics of study will cover all aspects of publishing a book from how it is constructed to how it is written and designed. Yearbook 11/12 students participate in all aspects of the production and completion of the yearbook. Students learn to use an on-line desk-top publishing program and graphics tools such as Adobe Photoshop. Yearbook design skills are taught in conjunction with computer skills as the students put together a 288 page book. This will be accomplished in individual as well as group settings. A positive attitude and commitment to the project is needed as well as the willingness to work with fellow students. Yearbook students also take the majority of the photos, and consequently photo composition and scanning techniques are part of the curriculum. Students who would enjoy putting together a quality book that will capture people's imagination are encouraged to take this course. Students selecting this course will be expected to meet all deadlines. This course will grant credit for Applied Skills or Fine Arts.

Prerequisite: Information Technology 11 or suitable computer skills.

Yearbook 12

This course offers students the chance to learn about the exciting world of publishing while actually working on our school yearbook. Topics of study will cover all aspects of publishing a book from how it is constructed to how it is written and designed. Yearbook 11/12 students participate in all aspects of the production and completion of the yearbook. Students learn to use an on-line desk-top publishing program and graphics tools such as Adobe Photoshop. Yearbook design skills are taught in conjunction with computer skills as the students put together a 288 page book. This will be accomplished in individual as well as group settings. A positive attitude and commitment to the project is needed as well as the willingness to work with fellow students. Yearbook students also take the majority of the photos, and consequently photo composition and scanning techniques are part of the curriculum. Students who would enjoy putting together a quality book that will capture people's imagination are encouraged to take this course. Students selecting this course will be expected to meet all deadlines. This course will grant credit for Applied Skills or Fine Arts.

Prerequisite: Information Technology 11 or suitable computer skills.

Performing Arts

Band 8

This group meets three times per week during the regular school schedule. Its purpose is for studying music through performance on an instrument in a full ensemble. The course of studies also includes solo performance and small ensemble work.

Prerequisite: Must have some experience playing a woodwind, brass or percussion instrument, or have permission of instructor.

Beginner Band 8

This group meets three times per week during the regular school schedule. Its purpose is to learn a new woodwind, brass or percussion instrument, and to prepare students for Junior or Intermediate Band. The course of studies also includes solo performance and small ensemble work.

Prerequisite: None

Jazz Band 8 (B)

Jazz Band (B) is for students for students who wish to develop skills related to the performance and improvisation of Jazz in a traditional Jazz Band setting.

This course will allow students to improvise better and perform appropriate Jazz solos within the context of a traditional Jazz band.

Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor

String Orchestra 8

This will be an Intermediate/Advanced course to develop skills related to the performance of Chamber Music in a traditional String Orchestral setting. Students will study and practice specific techniques essential to the production of various Orchestral idioms. Students will develop an understanding and identification of specific styles significant to the history of Orchestra.

Prerequisite: Must be able to play an orchestral string instrument. Permission of Instructor. Students

Wind Ensemble 8

This group meets one time per week on Wednesday mornings at 7AM. This course is reserved for students wishing to take their playing past a highschool level. Audition Only. Must also be a member of another music class to receive credits.

Prerequisite: Audition only. Must play a woodwind, brass or percussion instrument, or have permission of instructor.

Choir 8

Grade 8 Choir is an excellent course for any student who wishes to sing a wide variety of songs, to learn more about vocal technique, and to learn how to develop music reading skills. This group meets 3 times per week during the regular school schedule with the purpose of studying music through vocal performance in an ensemble.

Prerequisite: None

Dance 8

It is the goal of the Collingwood Dance Department to develop confident, well-rounded dancers that have a wide variety of kinetic vocabulary and creative thinking skills. The techniques that will be studied are: ballet, jazz, hip hop, and contemporary. Students will also learn how to structure sequences of movement and develop their own creative style using group improvisational work. Other areas that will be studied are modern dance history, and dance performance. All dancers will also be required to perform in various performances. This full credit course meets 3 times per week during the regular school schedule.

Prerequisite: None

Drama 8

In grade 8 Drama students are expected to work cooperatively in groups and with partners and to speak their lines honestly and in a confident, clear voice. Once lines are memorized, students play their scenes on their feet and make clear choices about movement and staging. In a major final presentation, students are expected to fully produce their scenes with costumes, props, dynamic movement, and honest acting. Students are encouraged to be constructively critical of their own work and the work of others, and expected to participate, with full energy, in acting exercises and improvisational activities. This group meets 3 times per week during the regular school schedule.

Prerequisite: None

Band 9

This group meets three times per week during the regular school schedule. Its purpose is for studying music through performance on an instrument in a full ensemble. The course of studies also includes solo performance and small ensemble work.

Prerequisite: Must have some experience playing a woodwind, brass or percussion instrument, or have permission of instructor.

Beginner Band 9

This group meets three times per week during the regular school schedule. Its purpose is to learn a new woodwind, brass or percussion instrument, and to prepare students for Junior or Intermediate Band. The course of studies also includes solo performance and small ensemble work.

Prerequisite: None

Jazz Band 9 (B)

Jazz Band (B) is for students for students who wish to develop skills related to the performance and improvisation of Jazz in a traditional Jazz Band setting.

This course will allow students to improvise better and perform appropriate Jazz solos within the context of a traditional Jazz band.

Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.

String Orchestra 9

This will be an Intermediate/Advanced course to develop skills related to the performance of Chamber Music in a traditional String Orchestral setting. Students will study and practice specific techniques essential to the production of various Orchestral idioms. Students will develop an understanding and identification of specific styles significant to the history of Orchestra.

Prerequisite: Must be able to play an orchestral string instrument. Permission of Instructor. Students

Corequisite: Must be enrolled in a second music course.

Wind Ensemble 9

This group meets one time per week on Wednesday mornings at 7AM. This course is reserved for students wishing to take their playing past a highschool level. Audition Only. Must also be a member of another music class to receive credits.

Prerequisite: Audition only. Must play a woodwind, brass or percussion instrument, or have permission of instructor.

Corequisite: Must be enrolled in a second music course.

Choir 9

Grade 9 Choir is an excellent course for any student who wishes to sing a wide variety of songs, to learn more about vocal technique, and to work on music reading skills. This group meets 3 times per week during the regular school schedule with the purpose of studying music through vocal performance in an ensemble.

Prerequisite: None

Dance 9

It is the goal of the Collingwood Dance Department to develop confident, well-rounded dancers that have a wide variety of kinetic vocabulary and creative thinking skills. The techniques that will be studied are: ballet, jazz, hip hop, and contemporary. Students will also learn how to structure sequences of movement and develop their own creative style using group improvisational work. Other areas that will be studied are modern dance history, and dance performance. All dancers will also be required to perform in various performances. This full credit course meets 3 times per week during the regular school schedule.

Prerequisite: None

Drama 9

Grade 9 provides the student with a wide range of opportunities to respond to their particular needs and interests and to explore and evaluate the dramatic process. The objective of the course is to acquire the knowledge and practise the skills necessary to perform live on stage. Live performance will take the following forms: Scene work; improvisation; movement presentation. This group meets 3 times per week during the regular school schedule.

Prerequisite: None

Stagecraft 9

Stagecraft focuses on Technical and Design knowledge development for live productions. The students explore the technical aspects of Lighting, Sound, and Set. Students will be involved with Drama Productions, the Musical and Dance show, from Design development to installation of Set, Light and Sound. Students will learn to operation these systems during performance. Students will also Design, Direct and Perform in class scenes. There will be a strong focus on Safety and Reliability. Students will aid in the maintenance of the theatre.

Prerequisite: Students must possess a strong work ethic and great determination to finish projects. Students must be willing to collaborate and work in teams. They must be flexible and adaptable in order to maximize their learning outcome from the course.

Beginner Band 10

This group meets three times per week during the regular school schedule. Its purpose is to learn a new woodwind, brass or percussion instrument, and to prepare students for Junior or Intermediate Band. The course of studies also includes solo performance and small ensemble work.

Prerequisite: None

Band 10

This group meets three times per week during the regular school schedule. Its purpose is to futher develop the students ability to play on their instrument. The course of studies also includes solo performance and small ensemble work.

Prerequisite: Must have completed Junior or Beginner Band (8-9), or have permission of instructor.

Jr. Jazz Band 10 (B)

Jr. Jazz Band (B) is for students for students who wish to develop skills related to the performance and improvisation of Jazz in a traditional Jazz Band setting.

This course will allow students to improvise better and perform appropriate Jazz solos within the context of a traditional Jazz band.

Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.

Corequisite: Must be enrolled in a second music course.


Senior Jazz Band 10 (A)

Senior Jazz Band (A) is for students who wish to further develop skills related to the performance and improvisation of Jazz in a traditional Jazz Band setting.

This course will allow students to improvise better and perform appropriate Jazz solos within the context of a traditional Jazz band.

Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.

Corequisite: Must be enrolled in a second music course.

String Orchestra 10

This will be an Intermediate/Advanced course to develop skills related to the performance of Chamber Music in a traditional String Orchestral setting. Students will study and practice specific techniques essential to the production of various Orchestral idioms. Students will develop an understanding and identification of specific styles significant to the history of Orchestra.

Prerequisite: Must be able to play an orchestral string instrument. Permission of Instructor. Students

Corequisite: Must be enrolled in a second music course.

Wind Ensemble 10

This group meets one time per week on Wednesday mornings at 7AM. This course is reserved for students wishing to take their playing past a highschool level. Audition Only. Must also be a member of another music class to receive credits.

Prerequisite: Audition only. Must play a woodwind, brass or percussion instrument, or have permission of instructor.

Corequisite: Must be enrolled in a second music course.

Choir 10

Choir 10 is an excellent course for any student who wants to continue to learn and explore music with their voices in an ensemble setting. It is for students who want to sing a wide variety of songs and learn about vocal technique. The course focuses on elements of ear training, sight reading, listening, music history and performance.

The classes are three times per week during the regular school schedule.

The Grade 10 Choir will perform a number of times throught the year, both in school and in the community.

Prerequisite: None.

Intermediate Chamber Choir 10

This course is an ensemble of grade 9 - 12 students who work on challenging SATB (Soprano, Alto, Tenor and Baritone) choral music. They learn Jazz, Pop, Classical and various ethnic music. This ensemble rehearses Friday at 7am. The course focuses on learning music through performance.

All of the students who are in this ensemble will automatically be a part of the Concert Choir with their performances and music expectations. This music will be rehearsed outside class time on Mondays 7am - or through using music files posted on their Google Drive.

Prerequisite: Audition or permission of Instructor

Senior Chamber Choir 10

This course is an ensemble of grade 10 - 12 students who work on High School/University level SATB (Soprano, Alto, Tenor and Baritone) choral music. They learn Jazz, Pop, Classical and various ethnic music. This ensemble rehearses Tuesday and Thursdays at 7am. The course focuses on learning music through performance.

All of the students who are in this ensemble will automatically be a part of the Concert Choir with their performances and music expectations. This music will be rehearsed outside class time on Mondays 7am - or through using music files posted on their Google Drive.

Prerequisite: Audition or permission of Instructor


Dance 10

It is the goal of the Collingwood Dance Department to develop confident, well-rounded dancers that have a wide variety of kinetic vocabulary and creative thinking skills. The techniques that will be studied are: ballet, jazz, hip hop, and contemporary. Students will also learn how to structure sequences of movement and develop their own creative style using group improvisational work. Other areas that will be studied are modern dance history, and dance performance. All dancers will also be required to perform in various performances. This full credit course meets 3 times per week during the regular school schedule.

Prerequisite: None.

Advanced Choreography 10

Advanced Choreography is the class and rehearsal time for the Senior Dance Company. This class is made up of students with more than 4 years of dance training/experience and they must have the approval of the Instructor. This course will offer an advanced level of Dance in the three areas of Classical Ballet, Jazz and Modern Dance plus exploration of Improvisational and Compositional forms. Ample opportunity for performance will be provided. Students will improve technical skills, knowledge and broaden their awareness of composition. Through historical research, problem-solving, and critiquing, the students will increase their understanding of artistic, intellectual, social and human development. This is a full credit course that takes place outside the regular timetable.

Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor

Advanced Hip Hop 10

Advanced Hip Hop is the class and rehearsal time for the Hip Hop Crew. This class is made up of students with more than 3 years of dance training/experience and they must have the approval of the Instructor. This course will offer an advanced level of Dance in Hip Hop and Street Jazz styles as well as exploration of Improvisational and Compositional forms. Ample opportunity for performance will be provided. Students will improve technical skills, knowledge and broaden their awareness of choreographic skills. This is a full credit course that takes place outside the regular timetable.

Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor

Drama 10

Grade 10 Drama continues to focus on the development of the essential skills necessary to perform effectively in front of an audience. The students explore how to play for a response, what a character is, and what truth in acting means. To that end, we rehearse and perform several short dramatic dialogues, focus on both verbal and non-verbal expression, and practice moving through space on stage to support the meaning of the scene.

Prerequisite: None

Stagecraft 10

Stagecraft focuses on Technical and Design knowledge development for live productions. The students explore the technical aspects of Lighting, Sound, and Set. Students will be involved with Drama Productions, the Musical and Dance show, from Design development to installation of Set, Light and Sound. Students will learn to operation these systems during performance. Students will also Design, Direct and Perform in class scenes. There will be a strong focus on Safety and Reliability. Students will aid in the maintenance of the theatre.

Prerequisite: Students must possess a strong work ethic and great determination to finish projects. Students must be willing to collaborate and work in teams. They must be flexible and adaptable in order to maximize their learning outcome from the course

Beginner Band 11

This group meets three times per week during the regular school schedule. Its purpose is to learn a new woodwind, brass or percussion instrument, and to prepare students for Junior or Intermediate Band. The course of studies also includes solo performance and small ensemble work.

Prerequisite: None

Senior Jazz Band 11 (A)

Senior Jazz Band (A) is for students who wish to further develop skills related to the performance and improvisation of Jazz in a traditional Jazz Band setting.

This course will allow students to improvise better and perform appropriate Jazz solos within the context of a traditional Jazz band.

Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.

Corequisite: Must be enrolled in a second music course.

Band 11

This group meets three times per week during the regular school schedule. Its purpose is to futher develop the students ability to play on their instrument. The course of studies also includes solo performance and small ensemble work.

Prerequisite: Must have completed Junior or Beginner Band (8-9), or have permission of instructor.

String Orchestra 11

This will be an Intermediate/Advanced course to develop skills related to the performance of Chamber Music in a traditional String Orchestral setting. Students will study and practice specific techniques essential to the production of various Orchestral idioms. Students will develop an understanding and identification of specific styles significant to the history of Orchestra.

Prerequisite: Must be able to play an orchestral string instrument. Permission of Instructor. Students

Corequisite: Must be enrolled in a second music course.

Wind Ensemble 11

This group meets one time per week on Wednesday mornings at 7AM. This course is reserved for students wishing to take their playing past a highschool level. Audition Only. Must also be a member of another music class to receive credits.

Prerequisite: Audition only. Must play a woodwind, brass or percussion instrument, or have permission of instructor.

Corequisite: Must be enrolled in a second music course.

Jazz Band 11 (B)

Jazz Band (B) is for students for students who wish to develop skills related to the performance and improvisation of Jazz in a traditional Jazz Band setting.

This course will allow students to improvise better and perform appropriate Jazz solos within the context of a traditional Jazz band.

Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.

Corequisite: Must be enrolled in a second music course.

Choir 11

Choir 11 is an excellent course for any student who wants to continue to learn and explore music with their voices in an ensemble setting. It is for students who want to sing a wide variety of songs and learn about vocal technique. The course focuses on elements of ear training, sight reading, listening, music history and performance.

The classes are three times per week during the regular school schedule.

The Grade 11 Choir will perform a number of times throughout the year, both in school and in the community.

Prerequisite: None.

Senior Chamber Choir 11

This course is an ensemble of grade 10 - 12 students who work on challenging SATB (Soprano, Alto and Baritone) choral music. They learn Jazz, Pop, Classical and various ethnic music. This ensemble rehearses Tuesdays and Thursdays at 7am. The course focuses on learning choral music through performance.

All of the students who are in this ensemble will automatically be a part of the Concert Choir with their performances and music expectations. This music will be rehearsed outside class time. Currently: Monday, Tuesday or Wednesday at lunch.

Prerequisite: Audition or permission of Instructor

Dance 11

It is the goal of the Collingwood Dance Department to develop confident, well-rounded dancers that have a wide variety of kinetic vocabulary and creative thinking skills. The techniques that will be studied are: ballet, jazz, hip hop, and contemporary. Students will also learn how to structure sequences of movement and develop their own creative style using group improvisational work. Other areas that will be studied are modern dance history, and dance performance. All dancers will also be required to perform in various performances. This full credit course meets 3 times per week during the regular school schedule.

Prerequisite: None

Advanced Choreography 11

Advanced Choreography is the class and rehearsal time for the Senior Dance Company. This class is made up of students with more than 4 years of dance training/experience and they must have the approval of the Instructor. This course will offer an advanced level of Dance in the three areas of Classical Ballet, Jazz and Modern Dance plus exploration of Improvisational and Compositional forms. Ample opportunity for performance will be provided. Students will improve technical skills, knowledge and broaden their awareness of composition. Through historical research, problem-solving, and critiquing, the students will increase their understanding of artistic, intellectual, social and human development. This is a full credit course that takes place outside of the regular timetable.

Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor

Advanced Hip Hop 11

Advanced Hip Hop is the class and rehearsal time for the Hip Hop Crew. This class is made up of students with more than 3 years of dance training/experience and they must have the approval of the Instructor. This course will offer an advanced level of Dance in Hip Hop and Street Jazz styles as well as exploration of Improvisational and Compositional forms. Ample opportunity for performance will be provided. Students will improve technical skills, knowledge and broaden their awareness of choreographic skills. This is a full credit course that takes place outside of the regular timetable.

Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor

Acting 11

In Grade 11/12 Acting, we continue working on some of the advanced skills necessary to play for truth on stage. Building on scene work and improvisational skills, students focus primarily on the elements of effective dramaturgy and storytelling, with an eye to creating and performing in front of an audience. To that end, we write and perform short pieces based on personal experience, create outlines based on a hero's journey, and stage and perform scenes around dramatic moments. As well, students work on short one-act plays with the emphasis placed on staging, production values, and playing honestly and simply.

Prerequisite: None

Intermediate Chamber Choir 11

This course is an ensemble of grade 9 - 12 students who work on challenging SATB (Soprano, Alto, Tenor and Baritone) choral music. They learn Jazz, Pop, Classical and various ethnic music. This ensemble rehearses Friday at 7am. The course focuses on learning music through performance.

All of the students who are in this ensemble will automatically be a part of the Concert Choir with their performances and music expectations. This music will be rehearsed outside class time on Mondays 7am - or through using music files posted on their Google Drive.

Prerequisite: Audition or permission of Instructor

Senior Chamber Choir 11

This course is an ensemble of grade 10 - 12 students who work on High School/University level SATB (Soprano, Alto, Tenor and Baritone) choral music. They learn Jazz, Pop, Classical and various ethnic music. This ensemble rehearses Tuesday and Thursdays at 7am. The course focuses on learning music through performance.

All of the students who are in this ensemble will automatically be a part of the Concert Choir with their performances and music expectations. This music will be rehearsed outside class time on Mondays 7am - or through using music files posted on their Google Drive.

Prerequisite: Audition or permission of Instructor


Stagecraft 11

Stagecraft focuses on Technical and Design knowledge development for live productions. The students explore the technical aspects of Lighting, Sound, and Set. Students will be involved with Drama Productions, the Musical and Dance show, from Design development to installation of Set, Light and Sound. Students will learn to operation these systems during performance. Students will also Design, Direct and Perform in class scenes. There will be a strong focus on Safety and Reliability. Students will aid in the maintenance of the theatre.

Prerequisite: Students must possess a strong work ethic and great determination to finish projects. Students must be willing to collaborate and work in teams. They must be flexible and adaptable in order to maximize their learning outcome from the course.

Beginner Band 12

This group meets three times per week during the regular school schedule. Its purpose is to learn a new woodwind, brass or percussion instrument, and to prepare students for Junior or Intermediate Band. The course of studies also includes solo performance and small ensemble work.

Prerequisite: None

Band 12

This group meets three times per week during the regular school schedule. Its purpose is to futher develop the students ability to play on their instrument. The course of studies also includes solo performance and small ensemble work.

Prerequisite: Must have completed Junior or Beginner Band (8-9), or have permission of instructor.

Jazz Band 12 (B)

Jazz Band (B) is for students for students who wish to develop skills related to the performance and improvisation of Jazz in a traditional Jazz Band setting.

This course will allow students to improvise better and perform appropriate Jazz solos within the context of a traditional Jazz band.

Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.

Corequisite: Must be enrolled in a second music course.

Senior Jazz Band 12 (A)

Senior Jazz Band (A) is for students who wish to further develop skills related to the performance and improvisation of Jazz in a traditional Jazz Band setting.

This course will allow students to improvise better and perform appropriate Jazz solos within the context of a traditional Jazz band.

Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.

Corequisite: Must be enrolled in a second music course.

Wind Ensemble 12

This group meets one time per week on Wednesday mornings at 7AM. This course is reserved for students wishing to take their playing past a highschool level. Audition Only. Must also be a member of another music class to receive credits.

Prerequisite: Audition only. Must play a woodwind, brass or percussion instrument, or have permission of instructor.

Corequisite: Must be enrolled in a second music course.

Choir 12

Choir 12 is an excellent course for any student who wants to continue to learn and explore music with their voices in an ensemble setting. It is for students who want to sing a wide variety of songs and learn about vocal technique. The course focuses on elements of ear training, sight reading, listening, music history and performance.

The classes are three times per week during the regular school schedule.

The Grade 12 Choir will perform a number of times throught the year, both in school and in the community.

Prerequisite: None.

Intermediate Chamber Choir 12

This course is an ensemble of grade 9 - 12 students who work on challenging SATB (Soprano, Alto, Tenor and Baritone) choral music. They learn Jazz, Pop, Classical and various ethnic music. This ensemble rehearses Friday at 7am. The course focuses on learning music through performance.

All of the students who are in this ensemble will automatically be a part of the Concert Choir with their performances and music expectations. This music will be rehearsed outside class time on Mondays 7am - or through using music files posted on their Google Drive.

Prerequisite: Audition or permission of Instructor


Senior Chamber Choir 12

This course is an ensemble of grade 10 - 12 students who work on High School/University level SATB (Soprano, Alto, Tenor and Baritone) choral music. They learn Jazz, Pop, Classical and various ethnic music. This ensemble rehearses Tuesday and Thursdays at 7am. The course focuses on learning music through performance.

All of the students who are in this ensemble will automatically be a part of the Concert Choir with their performances and music expectations. This music will be rehearsed outside class time on Mondays 7am - or through using music files posted on their Google Drive.

Prerequisite: Audition or permission of Instructor

Dance 12

It is the goal of the Collingwood Dance Department to develop confident, well-rounded dancers that have a wide variety of kinetic vocabulary and creative thinking skills. The techniques that will be studied are: ballet, jazz, hip hop, and contemporary. Students will also learn how to structure sequences of movement and develop their own creative style using group improvisational work. Other areas that will be studied are modern dance history, and dance performance. All dancers will also be required to perform in various performances. This group meets 3 times per week during the regular school schedule.

Prerequisite: None

Advanced Choreography 12

Advanced Choreography is the class and rehearsal time for the Senior Dance Company. This class is made up of students with more than 4 years of dance training/experience and they must have the approval of the Instructor. This course will offer an advanced level of Dance in the three areas of Classical Ballet, Jazz and Modern Dance plus exploration of Improvisational and Compositional forms. Ample opportunity for performance will be provided. Students will improve technical skills, knowledge and broaden their awareness of composition. Through historical research, problem-solving, and critiquing, the students will increase their understanding of artistic, intellectual, social and human development. This is a full credit course that takes place outside the regular timetable.

Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor

Advanced Hip Hop 12

Advanced Hip Hop is the class and rehearsal time for the Hip Hop Crew. This class is made up of students with more than 3 years of dance training/experience and they must have the approval of the Instructor. This course will offer an advanced level of Dance in Hip Hop and Street Jazz styles as well as exploration of Improvisational and Compositional forms. Ample opportunity for performance will be provided. Students will improve technical skills, knowledge and broaden their awareness of choreographic skills. This is a full credit course that takes place outside the regular timetable.

Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor

Acting 12

In Grade 11/12 Acting, we continue working on some of the advanced skills necessary to play for truth on stage. Building on scene work and improvisational skills, students focus primarily on the elements of effective dramaturgy and storytelling, with an eye to creating and performing in front of an audience. To that end, we write and perform short pieces based on personal experience, create outlines based on a hero's journey, and stage and perform scenes around dramatic moments. As well, students work on short one-act plays with the emphasis placed on staging, production values, and playing honestly and simply.

Prerequisite: None

Stagecraft 12

Stagecraft focuses on Technical and Design knowledge development for live productions. The students explore the technical aspects of Lighting, Sound, and Set. Students will be involved with Drama Productions, the Musical and Dance show, from Design development to installation of Set, Light and Sound. Students will learn to operation these systems during performance. Students will also Design, Direct and Perform in class scenes. There will be a strong focus on Safety and Reliability. Students will aid in the maintenance of the theatre.

Prerequisite: Students must possess a strong work ethic and great determination to finish projects. Students must be willing to collaborate and work in teams. They must be flexible and adaptable in order to maximize their learning outcome from the course.

String Orchestra 12

This will be an Intermediate/Advanced course to develop skills related to the performance of Chamber Music in a traditional String Orchestral setting. Students will study and practice specific techniques essential to the production of various Orchestral idioms. Students will develop an understanding and identification of specific styles significant to the history of Orchestra.

Prerequisite: Must be able to play an orchestral string instrument. Permission of Instructor. Students

Corequisite: Must be enrolled in a second music course.

English

English 8

In its exploration of the BC Ministry of Education’s English Language Arts’ “Big Ideas”, English 8 develops reading, speaking, and thinking strategies, as well as the writing processes needed for students to access text, guide inquiry, extend thinking, and to create and communicate ideas. Working with an expanded definition of text, students will delve into the form, function, and genre of a variety of text-types; recognize and use text features, literary elements, and literary devices, as well as language features, structures, and conventions. With texts selected to explore themes and issues relevant in today’s world, students will deepen their understanding of contexts--personal, social, and cultural--as well as the values and perspectives in texts; recognize the role of language in shaping identity; and construct meaningful personal connections to self, to other texts, and to the world. All English 8 students will prepare a presentation for Collingwood School’s annual Public Speaking Day

English 9

English 9 continues to develop reading, speaking, and thinking strategies, as well as the writing processes needed for students to access text, guide inquiry, extend thinking, and to create and communicate ideas with increasing sophistication. Working with an expanded definition of text, students will delve further into the form, function, and genre of a variety of text-types; and demonstrate increasing skill in their awareness and use of text features, literary elements, and literary devices, as well as language features, structures, and conventions. With texts selected by both teachers and students exploring themes and issues relevant in today’s world, students deepen their understanding of contexts, values, and perspectives in texts; further consider the role of language in shaping identity; and continue to construct meaningful personal connections to self, to other texts, and to the world. All English 9 students will prepare a presentation for Collingwood School’s annual Public Speaking Day.

English 10

English 10 has a unique structure: as a four credit course, students are required to complete two modules--each for a half-year and each assigned two credits. At Collingwood, all students will be enrolled in English 10 Literary Studies for a half year; in this foundational component, students will continue to develop their skills in literary appreciation and analysis across a variety of text-types; as well, the students will continue to develop their written composition and communication skills in a variety of styles--both creative and formal--with a specific focus on the essay form. All students will prepare a presentation for our annual Public Speaking Day, and all students are required to complete the Provincial Grade 10 Graduation Literacy Assessment.

In addition to English 10 Literary Studies, students will be required to take one of the following modules:

English 10 Creative Writing

Story is central to this English 10 module, and students will be immersed in a range of styles, genres, and text-types. Students will continue to read, analyze, and communicate in a variety of ways, with a specific focus on creative expression through a Writer’s Workshop approach.

English 10 New Media

Interactivity is central to this English 10 module, and students will be immersed in the ways we use media to communicate and exchange ideas. Students will continue to read, analyze, and communicate in a variety of ways, with a specific focus on the digital world.

English 10 Spoken Language

Voice is central to this English 10 module, and students will be immersed in the ways this power can be shaped for specific situations and purposes. Students will continue to read, analyze, and communicate in a variety of ways, with a specific focus on the power of the spoken word.

English Composition 11/AP Capstone Seminar 11

This course incorporates the dual aims and objectives of two curricula: the BC Ministry of Education’s English Composition 11 and the College Board’s AP Capstone Seminar; both courses are studied concurrently. The course engages students in cross-curricular conversations that explore the complexities of academic and real-world topics and issues by analyzing divergent perspectives. Using an inquiry framework, students practice reading and analyzing articles and research studies, as well as foundational, literary, and philosophical texts; they listen to and view speeches, broadcasts, and personal accounts; and they experience artistic works and performances. Students learn to synthesize information from multiple sources, develop their own perspectives in written essays, and design and deliver oral and visual presentations, both individually and as part of a team. Ultimately, the course aims to equip students with the power to analyze and evaluate information with accuracy and precision in order to craft and communicate evidence-based arguments. All English 11 students will prepare a presentation for Collingwood School’s annual Public Speaking Day.

English Studies 12

The BC Ministry of Education’s English Studies 12 course builds on and extends students’ previous learning experiences in English Language Arts. It provides students with opportunities to: refine their ability to communicate effectively in a variety of contexts, to achieve their personal and career goals, and to think critically and creatively about the uses of language. Students will explore texts from a variety of sources, in multiple modes, and that reflect diverse worldviews; this will allow students to deepen their understanding of themselves and others in a changing world, to gain insight into the diverse factors that shape identity, and to appreciate the importance of self-representation through text. In addition, this course will contribute to Reconciliation by building greater understanding of the knowledge and perspectives of First Peoples and expand students’ understanding of what it means to be educated Canadian and global citizens. All English Studies 12 students will prepare a presentation for Collingwood’s annual Public Speaking Day; continue to develop their academic research and writing skills through the completion of the Extended Research Essay; and, beginning in 2020-2021, are required to complete the Provincial Grade 12 Graduation Literacy Assessment.

AP English Language & Composition 12

As a university-level course through which students have the opportunity to earn university credits and/or placement, this course incorporates the dual aims and objectives of two curricula: the College Board’s AP English Language & Composition and the BC Ministry of Education’s English Studies 12. Students will read critically and extensively; write precisely and effectively; and speak knowledgeably and articulately. At its foundation, this is a course about rhetoric--the art of persuasion. Students will study the ways people produce text to create and communicate meaning and, in turn, develop their own abilities to write in a variety of genres, with particular attention to synthesis, rhetorical analysis, and argumentative essays. In addition, public speaking skills are honed for Collingwood’s annual Public Speaking Day, and academic research and writing skills are developed through the Extended Research Essay process. In addition, students will write the AP English Language & Composition Exam in May, as well as--beginning in 2020-2021--the Provincial Grade 12 Graduation Literacy Assessment.

Creative Writing 12

Creative Writing 12 is designed for students who are interested in exploring and creating a body of work reflective of their ongoing development as a writer. The course provides students with opportunities to explore the nature of building a story within the varied genres of fiction and non-fiction; within these realms there is a great deal of artistic freedom, and students will be encouraged to explore and experiment in order to discover their own unique voices as young writers. From the daily 15-minute free write to the highly polished, extensively re-written assignments, students will engage in the exploration of personal and cultural identities, memories, and stories in a wide range of genres. As the year progresses, students will refine their ability to write in complex, controlled styles with effectiveness and impact. Within this supportive community, students will collaborate and develop their skills through writing and design processes, celebrating successes.

Literary Studies 12

This course incorporates the dual aims and objectives of two curricula: the BC Ministry of Education’s Literary Studies 12 and the College Board’s AP Literature and Composition. Although both courses are studied concurrently, a student can opt to study only Literary Studies 12. This course allows students to delve more deeply into literature as they increase their literacy skills through close reading of appropriately challenging texts and further refine higher-level, critical thinking skills. As they read, students consider a work's structure, style, and themes, as well as its use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone. Writing assignments include expository, analytical, and argumentative essays that require students to analyze and interpret literary works. Through a study of some of the greatest poems in the English tradition from the last millennium starting with the Anglo-Saxon epic Beowulf, to a lyrical poem by Canada’s most eminent lady of letters, Margaret Atwood, as well as a study of a self-selected classic American novel, students hone their literary analysis skills.

AP Literature & Composition 12

This course incorporates the dual aims and objectives of two curricula: the College Board’s AP Literature and Composition and the BC Ministry of Education’s Literary Studies 12. The AP English Literature and Composition course aligns to an introductory college-level literary analysis course. The course engages students in the close reading and critical analysis of a variety of literature to deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure. As they read, students consider a work's structure, style, and themes, as well as its use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone. Writing assignments include expository, analytical, and argumentative essays that require students to analyze and interpret literary works. Through their study of some of the greatest poems in the English tradition from the last millennium, starting with the Anglo-Saxon epic Beowulf, to a lyrical poem by Canada’s most eminent lady of letters, Margaret Atwood, as well as a study of a self-selected classic American novel, students hone their skills in preparation for the AP Exam held in May.


New Media 12

New Media 12 challenges and develops students’ critical and creative thinking skills. This course explores concepts in media theory, film studies, philosophy, and psychology to analyze how social media, advertising, journalism, video games, art, and film help shape culture and society. Through the exploration of Plato to McLuhan, Zuckerberg to Kubrick, the purpose of the course is to develop students’ ability to critically respond to a variety of evolving media and emerging technologies. The course engages learners in discussions and projects focused on topics such as: social media’s effect on society (politics, government, art, and culture); technology’s effects on both our brains and behaviour; advertisers’ use of psychological techniques to persuade and manipulate; the significance of moral binaries, bias, sensationalism, and satire in the news; the limits and potentials of art and entertainment; and cinema’s ability to evoke emotion, further ideologies, and convey meaning beyond the literal. This elective is a project-based course in which students work individually and in teams to analyze, criticize, synthesize, evaluate, and create a variety of media, ranging from print advertisements, commercials, short films, and full feature films.

AP Capstone Research 12

AP Capstone Research, the second course in the AP Capstone experience, allows students to deeply explore an academic topic, problem, issue, or idea of individual interest. Students design, plan, and implement a yearlong investigation to address a research question. Through this inquiry, they further the skills acquired in the AP Capstone Seminar course by learning research methods; employing ethical research practices; and accessing, analyzing, and synthesizing information. Students reflect on their skills development, document their processes, and curate the artifacts of their scholarly work through a process and reflection portfolio. The course culminates in an academic paper of 4,000-5,000 words and a presentation with an oral defense.

Prerequisite: completion of AP Capstone Seminar

Students who earn scores of 3 or higher in AP Capstone Seminar, AP Capstone Research, and on four additional AP Exams of their choice will receive the AP Capstone Diploma.

Students who earn scores of 3 or higher in AP Capstone Seminar and AP Capstone Research, but not on four additional AP Exams, will receive the AP Seminar and Research Certificate.

Scriptwriting 12

In the 21st century media-saturated landscape, it is critical for young people to create--as opposed to merely consume--media. Scriptwriting 12 is a skills-based, interdisciplinary course that provides opportunities for students to create scripts for television, film, theatre, and/or video-games. In addition to challenging students to create original scripts, this course also includes script analysis; students will learn how to deconstruct a variety of professionally established scripts from different genres and platforms, which will allow them to understand their structures and conventions. By learning about genre, narrative, character development, dialogue, subtext, and theme, as well as concepts like “show don’t tell,” and the “save the cat method”, students will better appreciate the literacy and fine art of writing creative screenplays, teleplays, stage-plays, and video-game scripts. Through engaging activities such as writer’s workshop, film or scene deconstructions, re-writing existing scripts, and transmediating scripts (adapting them from one medium to another), students will better understand how to analyze, evaluate, and create scripts of all kinds. Students will have the opportunity to design their own term projects. Whether it is conceptualizing, writing and creating their own television show, writing and producing a music video, developing and designing the story of a video game, or writing their own short or feature film, students will have cross-curricular opportunities, including the potential opportunity to hand their work over to film production, drama, or game design classes for adaptation.

Extended studies

Leadership 11

Leadership 11 is an exciting course for credit that is designed for students who wish to develop their leadership skills, abilities to motivate others, attain self-awareness in their interactions with others, and ultimately improve their self-confidence in leadership situations. It is designed for Grade 10 or 11 students who are independent and self-motivated learners. This course is scheduled out of the timetable and students have one year to complete it. The course has four elements: Leadership Seminars, a Senior School Explore Expedition, Choose Your Own Leadership, and creating a Leadership Weebly Portfolio that highlights the students' reflections from these experiences.

Seminars: Throughout the year, there will be 7-9 seminars which will occur approximately once a month after school from 3:20-5pm with the exception of the first seminar which will be an overnight retreat early September. These seminars are mandatory and students will find them dynamic and interactive. Some of the themes will be: definitions of Leadership, Personal Leadership, Leadership qualities, Leading Others and Team Building, Situational Leadership, Community-Ship, Leadership Decision Making, Stages of Group Development, Tips and Tools of Leadership, and a Leadership Debate.

Expedition: Students must complete a Senior School Explore Expedition as a culminating activity to complete the course. A non-refundable deposit for their expedition is due upon acceptance into the course. These trips create a chance for students to take what they’ve learned in theory and apply it in a real, safe and practical scenario.

Prerequisite: Students must apply by completing an application (which can be found here under the Leadership 11 tab). Successful participation in Explore 9 is strongly recommended.

Languages

French 8

French 8 aims to help students build confidence, communication and trust in all second-language classroom relationships while being immersed in a fun and interactive French environment. The students will develop their language skills (oral, listening, reading, writing) in an expressive context using authentic tasks and materials. Technology will also be integrated into the curriculum. Some of the concepts that will be studied include high-frequency vocabulary, the present tense of regular and irregular verbs, adjectives, and the passé composé. Cultural components include a French music component in which students will be exposed to a variety of Francophone artists as well as several short graphic novels.

This course is in accordance with the BC Ministry of Education's core curricular competencies.

Prerequisites: French 7

Note: If students are strong enough in the course or have an immersion/Francophone background, they may be recommended by their teacher for French 8/9 Accelerated rather than French 8. Please note that French 8/9 Accelerated is a more advanced and enriched course that is a blend of French 8 and French 9 course content.

French 8 Accelerated

This course is aimed at strong language students with either an immersion background or a high level of French. The course covers an enriched and blended French 8 and 9 content and is aimed at students who are hoping to take French 10 Enriched, 11 Enriched and French 12AP in the upper grades.

It is a course which builds upon the knowledge and skills acquired in French K-7. Its aim is to help students deepen their understanding of French so that they can gain more confidence in expressing themselves in conveying meaning. The students will develop their language skills (oral, listening, reading, writing) in an expressive context using authentic tasks and materials. Technology will also be integrated into the curriculum. Students will also work on a variety of tasks in the language lab in order to build fluency. Some of the concepts that will be studied include the past tense, modal verb construction, adverbs, direct/indirect object pronouns as well as relative pronouns. Films, music, and authentic documents in French from a variety of Francophone sources will allow students to learn about other cultural communities in order to better understand their own cultural community and to see the world from a new perspective.

This course is in accordance with the BC Ministry of Education's core curricular competencies.

Prerequisite: Students must demonstrate strong skills in the following areas (listening, reading, writing, and speaking) in their French 7 or equivalent course. They will also be assessed during a written and oral placement exam to determine the successful candidates for French 8 Accelerated.

Spanish 8

In this course, students will develop their language skills (oral, listening, reading, writing) in an expressive context using authentic tasks and materials. A strong academic foundation is provided in accordance with the Learning Outcomes prescribed by The Ministry of Education for grade 8. This year, Spanish 8 will include practice sessions in the Sony Virtuoso language laboratory with the goal of developing further students' reading, writing and communication skills. The course also provides an introduction to the cultures of Latin America and Spain. Students' learning experiences are enriched with a series of games, stories, videos, arts and crafts, and the celebration of several important Latin American festivals.

This course is in accordance with the BC Ministry of Education's core curricular competencies.

Prerequisite: None

French 9

French 9 is a course which builds upon the knowledge and skills acquired in French K-8. Its aim is to help students deepen their understanding of French so that they can gain more confidence in expressing themselves and in conveying meaning. The students will develop their language skills (oral, listening, reading, writing) in an expressive context using authentic tasks and materials. Technology will also be integrated into the curriculum. Students will also have the opportunity to work on a variety of tasks in the language lab in order to build fluency. Some of the concepts that will be studied include refinement of the past tense, modal verb construction, adverbs, object pronouns and relative pronouns. Films, music, and authentic documents from a variety of Francophone sources will allow students to learn about other cultural communities in order to better understand their own cultural community and to see the world from a new perspective. Students will work on their pronunciation, speaking and listening skills in the language lab.

This course is in accordance with the BC Ministry of Education's Core French curricular competencies.

Prerequisite: French 8

French 9 Enriched

The curriculum of the French 9 Enriched program generally follows the content of the regular French 9 program, but with some differences in methodology and enrichment materials. Such activities may include a novel or literature study, review of authentic magazine documents, debates and film critiques, all conducted exclusively in French. An additional component will be added to the regular French 9 exam to reflect the enrichment of the curriculum. Students are largely involved in small and large group activities where equal emphasis is placed upon oral and written French to integrate the four strands of language acquisition: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Technology and research will also be integrated into the curriculum and students will have the opportunity to use the language lab for oral practice. Students will be working on strengthening their skills in the following areas: listening, speaking, reading and writing with the addition of AP style activities. Some of the concepts that will be studied include refinement of the past tense, modal verb construction, adverbs, object pronouns and relative pronouns. Films, music, and authentic documents from a variety of Francophone sources will allow students to learn about other cultural communities in order to better understand their own cultural community and to see the world from a new perspective. Students will work on their pronunciation, speaking and listening skills in the language lab.

This course is in accordance with the BC Ministry of Education's core curricular competencies.

Prerequisite: Grade 8 French with an 86% standing, classroom teacher recommendation and Head of Department approval.

Spanish 9

In this course, students will develop their language skills (oral, listening, reading, writing) in an expressive context using authentic tasks and materials. A strong academic foundation is provided in accordance with the Learning Outcomes prescribed by The Ministry of Education for grade 9. This year, Spanish 9 will include practice sessions in the Sony Virtuoso language laboratory with the goal of developing further students' reading, writing and communication skills. The course also provides an introduction to the cultures of Latin America and Spain. Students' learning experiences are enriched with a series of games, stories, videos, arts and crafts, and the celebration of several important Latin American festivals.

This course is in accordance with the BC Ministry of Education's core curricular competencies.

Prerequisite: Spanish 8

French 10

French 10 is a course that builds upon the knowledge and skills acquired in previous years. Its aim is to help students build confidence, communication and trust in and interactive and immersive French environment. The students will develop their language skills (speaking, listening, reading and writing) in an expressive context using authentic tasks and materials. Technology and research will also be integrated into the curriculum. The themes explored include: ethnic cuisine, childhood memories, and advertising. Students will also be introduced to a diverse range of Francophone culture through audio-visual and print resources. Work will be completed to enhance and improve students' listening, speaking, reading and writing skills.

This course is in accordance with the BC Ministry of Education's core curricular competencies.

Prerequisite: French 9 or French 8/9 Accelerated

French 10 Enriched

This course is aimed at students who are hoping to take French 11 Enriched and French Language and Culture 12AP in the upper grades.

The curriculum of the French 10 Enriched program generally follows the content of the regular French 10 program, but with some differences in methodology and enrichment materials. Such activities may include a novel or literature study, review of authentic magazine documents, debates and film critiques, all conducted exclusively in French. An additional component will be added to the regular French 10 exam to reflect the enrichment of the curriculum. A detailed study of various themes will culminate with a unit assignment to form as the basis for development of vocabulary and language skills in the course. Students are largely involved in small and large group activities where equal emphasis is placed upon oral and written French to integrate the four strands of language acquisition: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Technology and research will also be integrated into the curriculum and students will have the opportunity to use the language lab for oral practice. New grammatical concepts such as the imperfect and its distinction from the preterite as well as the present participle are formally presented and applied to oral and written work. Students will be working on strengthening their skills in the following areas: listening, speaking, reading and writing with the addition of AP style activities.

This course is in accordance with the BC Ministry of Education's core curricular competencies.

Prerequisite: Grade 9 French or French 8/9 Accelerated with an 86% standing, classroom teacher recommendation and Head of Department approval

Spanish 10

Spanish 10 is a course that builds upon the knowledge acquired in Spanish 9. The content of this course is largely determined by the Learning Outcomes prescribed by the Ministry of Education for Spanish 10. Class instruction will target listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Students will be encouraged to use Spanish as their main language to communicate with each other and with the teacher. Students' learning experiences are enriched with a series of games, stories, videos, arts and crafts, and the celebration of some important Latin American festivals. Students will also have the opportunity to work on a variety of skill-based tasks in the language lab in order to build further fluency in reading, writing, listening, and in particular, speaking.

This course is in accordance with the BC Ministry of Education's core curricular competencies.

Prerequisite: Spanish 9

Spanish 10 Enriched

This course is an enriched program that will prepare students to take Spanish 11 Enriched and AP Spanish Language the following year. The content of this course is largely determined by the curricular competencies prescribed by the Ministry of Education for Spanish 10. The goal of this course is to develop listening, speaking, reading and writing skills and to foster an understanding of the basic grammatical structures necessary to communicate in Spanish at the upper intermediate level. The enrichment activities include learning language through literature from Latin America and Spain, cultural activities, traditional games and Spanish language songs. Students will also have the opportunity to work on a variety of skill-based tasks in the language lab in order to build fluency in reading, writing, listening, and in particular, speaking. They will be encouraged to use Spanish as the only means of communication within the classroom setting.

**The curriculum of the Spanish 10 Enriched program generally follows the content of the regular Spanish 10 program, but with some differences in methodology and enrichment materials. Such activities may include reviews of authentic documents, debates and film critiques, all conducted exclusively in Spanish.

Prerequisite: Spanish 9 with an 86% standing and recommendation and approval of classroom teacher and Head of Department


Spanish Introductory 11

Spanish Introductory 11 is a demanding course that will include many of the core concepts covered in Spanish 8, 9 and 10. The course's content will include listening, speaking, reading and writing in the target language, but given the course load, emphasis will be placed on grammar acquisition and application to reading and writing. Introduction to Spanish 11 will include practice sessions in the Sony Virtuoso language laboratory with the goal of developing further student's reading, writing and communication skills. Pending time limits, activities such as games, stories, videos, and the celebration of important Latin American festivals may also be included. They will be required to practise their language skills at home and in the classroom through the completion of projects and other authentic tasks. The access code for the e-text will be provided by the teacher at the beginning of the year.

This course is only open to students in Grades 10 or 11.

This course is in accordance with the BC Ministry of Education's core curricular competencies.

French 11

French 11 is a course that builds upon the knowledge and skills acquired in previous years. Its aim is to help students build confidence, communication and trust in an interactive and immersive French environment. The students will develop their language skills (speaking, listening, reading and writing) in an expressive context using authentic tasks and materials. Technology and research will also be integrated into the curriculum. The themes explored include: the arts, the Francophone world and travel, health and well being. Students will also be introduced to a diverse range of Francophone culture through audio-visual and print resources. This is designed to provide sequential practice and evaluation of students' listening, speaking, reading and writing skills.

This course is in accordance with the BC Ministry of Education's core curricular competencies.

Prerequisite: French 10 / 10 Enriched

French 11 Enriched

This course is aimed at students who are hoping to take French 12AP in Grade 12.

The curriculum of the French 11 Enriched generally follows the content of the regular French 11 program, with differences in methodology and enrichment materials. This is a course, which builds upon the knowledge and skills acquired in French K-10. Our aim is to help students build confidence, communication and trust in all classroom relationships while being immersed in a fun French environment. The focus of this course is to help students build the necessary skills (listening and reading comprehension, writing and speaking) to pursue AP French the following year. The students will develop these skills in an expressive context using authentic tasks and materials. We will study the following tenses: plus-que-parfait, conditionnel, conditionnel passé, and sequence of tenses in conditional clauses. We will also be looking at thematic vocabulary on different themes and students will also be introduced to Francophone culture through audio-visual and written materials. The AP methodology will be used to teach the course content.

This course is in accordance with the BC Ministry of Education's core curricular competencies.

Prerequisite: French 10 Enriched 86% standing with classroom teacher recommendation as well as Head of Department's permission

** Students who have completed French 10 may apply for French 11 Enriched but will also require an 86% standing and approval of the classroom teacher and Head of Department

Spanish 11

Spanish 11 is a course that builds upon the material studied in Spanish 10. Class instruction will target listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. A strong academic foundation is provided in accordance with the Learning Outcomes prescribed by the Ministry of Education for Spanish 11. Students’ learning experiences are enriched with a series of games, stories, videos, arts and crafts, and the celebration of some important Latin American festivals. Students will be encouraged to use Spanish as their main language to communicate with each other and with the teacher. Students will also have the opportunity to work on a variety of skill-based tasks in the language lab in order to build further fluency in reading, writing, listening, and in particular, speaking.

This course is in accordance with the BC Ministry of Education's core curricular competencies.

Prerequisite: Spanish 10

Spanish 11 Enriched

This course is an enriched program that will prepare students to take Spanish 12 or AP Spanish Language the following year. The content of this course is largely determined by the curricular competencies prescribed by the Ministry of Education for Spanish 11. The goal of this course is to develop listening, speaking, reading and writing skills and to foster an understanding of the basic grammatical structures necessary to communicate in Spanish at the upper intermediate level. The enrichment activities include learning language through literature from Latin America and Spain, cultural activities, traditional games and Spanish language songs. Students will also have the opportunity to work on a variety of skill-based tasks in the language lab in order to build fluency in reading, writing, listening, and in particular, speaking. They will be encouraged to use Spanish as the only means of communication within the classroom setting.

**The curriculum of the Spanish 11 Enriched program generally follows the content of the regular Spanish 11 program, but with some differences in methodology and enrichment materials. Such activities may include reviews of authentic documents, debates and film critiques, all conducted exclusively in Spanish.

This course is in accordance with the BC Ministry of Education's core curricular competencies.

Prerequisite: Spanish 10 or 10 Enriched with an 86% standing and with classroom teacher and Head of Department approval

French 12

French 12 aims to help students build confidence, communication and trust in all second-language classroom relationships while being immersed in an engaging French environment. The students will develop their language skills (speaking, listening, reading and writing) in an expressive context using authentic tasks and materials. Technology and research will also be integrated into the curriculum. Some of the concepts that will be studied include thematic vocabulary, the conditional past, the present and past subjunctive, the indicative vs. the subjunctive, complex relative pronouns, and conjunctions. Students will also be introduced to Francophone culture through audio-visual and print resources. Throughout the year, students will be working on strengthening their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills.

This course is in accordance with the BC Ministry of Education's core curricular competencies.

Prerequisite: French 11 or French 11 Enriched

AP French Language and Culture 12

Students who enroll in the Advanced Placement Program in French Language and Culture should already have a good command of French grammar and vocabulary and have competence in the following four skills: listening comprehension, reading comprehension, speaking and writing. The AP French Language and Culture course seeks to develop these skills even further and it will also emphasize the use of language for active communication to help students develop the following: the ability to understand spoken French in various contexts ; a French vocabulary sufficiently ample for reading newspapers and magazine articles, literary texts and other non-technical writings without depending on a dictionary ; the ability to express themselves coherently, resourcefully, and with reasonable fluency and accuracy in both written and spoken French. Particular emphasis will be placed on: interpretive communication, presentational speaking and writing and interpersonal speaking and writing. The six major themes studied are: Beauty and Aesthetics, Families and Communities, Personal and Public Identities, Contemporary Life, Science and Technology and Global Challenges. The course will also provide opportunities for students to demonstrate an understanding of the perspectives, practices and products of the target cultures.

This course is in accordance with the BC Ministry of Education's core curricular competencies.

Prerequisite: French 11 Enriched with an 86% standing with classroom teacher recommendation and Head of Department permission

French Literature 12

The French Literature 12 course is designed to introduce students who have advanced language skills to the formal study of a representative body of literary texts in French. The works of the following authors will be studied: Molière, Voltaire, Laye, Maupassant and selected poems by La Fontaine, Apollinaire, Baudelaire, du Bellay and Louise Labé. The goal of this course is to teach students to read, analyze, and understand French literary texts. Students will become thoroughly familiar with all the required texts and will analyze them in depth. Classes will include close readings and discussion of texts and regular essay writing. Particular attention is given to character and theme, structure and style. Students learn to analyse text analytically. The students are taught the techniques of literary analysis as well as the basic vocabulary of critical terms as we encounter them.

This course is in accordance with the BC Ministry of Education's core curricular competencies.

Prerequisite: Open to students who have completed French 11 Enriched, French 12 and AP French 12 with good standing

Spanish 12

Spanish 12 is an advanced course that builds upon the knowledge acquired in Spanish 11. The content of the course is largely determined by the learning outcomes prescribed by the Ministry of Education for Spanish 12. Students will be introduced to colloquial Spanish and idiomatic expressions used in everyday conversation by native speakers. Class instruction will target listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. The class will be conducted mostly in Spanish. Students will be encouraged to use Spanish as the only means of communication within the classroom setting. Students’ learning experiences will be enriched with a series of games, stories, videos, arts and crafts, and the celebration of some important Latin American festivals. Students will also have the opportunity to work on a variety of skill-based tasks in the language lab in order to build further fluency in reading, writing, listening, and in particular, speaking.

This course is in accordance with the BC Ministry of Education's core curricular competencies.

Prerequisite: Spanish 11 or Spanish 11 Enriched

AP Spanish Language and Culture 12

The Advanced Placement Program in Spanish Language is for students who already have competence in the following four skills: speaking, writing, listening comprehension, and reading comprehension. This course seeks to develop these skills even further in order for the students to be able to: understand spoken Spanish in different contexts, broaden their vocabulary so that they can understand more complex written material from different sources, and to express themselves with reasonable fluency and accuracy in both written and spoken Spanish. As the goal of the programme is to have students immersed in the Spanish language, students will be encouraged to use Spanish as the only means of communication within the classroom setting. Students will also have the opportunity to work on a variety of skill-based tasks in the language lab in order to build further fluency in reading, writing, listening, and in particular, speaking.

This course is in accordance with the BC Ministry of Education's core curricular competencies.

Prerequisite: Spanish 11 Enriched with an 86% standing, and the classroom teacher's recommendation and Head of Department's approval

Mathematics

Mathematics 8

The big ideas for this course include enable students to develop their skills through reasoning and analyzing, understanding and solving, communicating and representing, and connecting and reflecting. Math 8 extends on the curricular competencies from Math 7, raising the expectations in their applications. The course is cumulative in nature and designed to reinforce concept and skills that students will need for future mathematic courses.

The major topics of the course include:

  • Integers
  • Fractions and Decimals
  • Percents, Ratios & Proportions
  • Linear Expressions
  • Linear Equations
  • Linear Relations & Graphing
  • Probability
  • Pythagorean Theorem
  • Geometry

Prerequisite: Mathematics 7

Mathematics 8/9 Accelerated

This course will cover two years of math in one. In addition, students will be challenged with weekly contest problems. The curriculum will focus on problem based learning to provide students with the opportunity to make connections between math and the real world. The goal is for students to develop deep mathematical understanding and fluency, logical reasoning, analytic thought, and creative thinking, by actively investigating problems and finding solutions. Students who successfully complete this course will receive credit for Math 9.

The Accelerated Math 8/9 curriculum is:

  • Square Roots and Exponents
  • Polynomials
  • Factoring: GCF, difference of squares, various trinomials
  • Solving Equations and Inequalities
  • Rates, Ratios, Proportions and Percent
  • Linear Relations
  • Radicals
  • Geometry
  • Surface Area and Volume
  • Statistics

Financial LiteracyPrerequisite: Recommendation from Wentworth Math 7 teacher, and final mark

*New students at Collingwood must take a Math 8/9 Challenge Exam and be approved by the Head of Department. The exam will be written after school during the first week of September.

Mathematics 9

This course will include the British Columbia Math 9 curriculum as well as enrichment activities that provide students with higher level mathematical thinking skills while investigating many topics in greater depth. The curriculum will focus on problem based learning to provide students with the opportunity to make connections between math and the real world. The goal is for students to develop deep mathematical understanding and fluency, logical reasoning, analytic through, and creative thinking, by actively investigating problems and finding solutions.

The Grade 9 curriculum is:

  • Square Roots and Exponents
  • Polynomials
  • Factoring: GCF, difference of squares, various trinomials
  • Solving Equations and Inequalities
  • Linear Relations
  • Radicals
  • Geometry
  • Statistics
  • Financial Literacy

Prerequisite: Mathematics 8

Foundations of Math and Pre-Calculus 10

This course enables students to think abstractly, to make connections between relationships, and to analyze and represent mathematical situations through various contexts. Students will become more familiar with technological devices to help them find patterns and solutions. They will build upon their algebraic background and make connections through graphing. Students will work on explaining and reasoning their solutions through real-world applications.

The following topics will be covered with an emphasis on developing abstract thinking abilities:

  • Change the Foundations of Math and Pre-Calculus 10 content to say:
  • Characteristics of Linear Relations
  • Linear Equations
  • Systems of Equations
  • Relations and Functions
  • Arithmetic Sequences and Series
  • Numbers, Exponents, and Radicals
  • Polynomials
  • Right-Angled Trigonometry

Financial LiteracyPrerequisite: Mathematics 9

Pre-Calculus 11

Students following the Pre-Calculus pathway will spend more time developing their understanding of symbol manipulation and of generalizations of more sophisticated mathematical concepts. The primary purpose of Pre-Calculus will be to develop the formalism students will need to continue on with the study of calculus.

The following topics will be covered with an emphasis on developing abstract thinking abilities:

  • Absolute value, radical, and reciprocal functions
  • Quadratic functions
  • Rational functions
  • Quadratic equations and systems of equations and inequalities
  • Trigonometry
  • Sequence and series

Prerequisite: Foundations of Math and Pre-Calculus 10

Pre-Calculus 11 Accelerated

This course will cover the following units:

  • Sequences and Series
  • Absolute Value and Radicals
  • Factoring and Functions
  • Quadratic Equations
  • Quadratic Functions
  • Transformations
  • Polynomials
  • Rational Expressions and Rational Functions
  • Permutations and Combinations


Prerequisite: A course mark of at least 90% in Foundations and Pre-Calculus 10, a teacher recommendation from the Foundations and Pre-Calculus 10 course, and approval from the Head of Mathematics.

Foundations of Math 11

In order to meet the challenges of society, high school graduates must be numerate. Students following this pathway will have opportunities to improve their numeracy skills and concepts. Developing a sense of numeracy will help them to understand how mathematical concepts permeate daily life, business, industry, and government. Students need to be able to use mathematics not just in their work lives, but in their personal lives as citizens and consumers. It is intended that students will learn to value mathematics and become confident in their mathematical abilities.

Foundations of Math is designed for students are intending on studying in the Faculty of Arts at the post-secondary level. It does not prepare the student for calculus. Students must check with University Guidance or the Mathematics Department to see individual university entrance requirements.

This course will cover the following units:

  • Exponential Functions
  • Quadratic Functions,
  • Linear Systems - Solve by graphing
  • Linear Systems - Solve algebraically
  • Linear Programming
  • Finance
  • Geometry – Circles
  • Trigonometry
  • Measurement
  • Misleading Graphs

Prerequisite:
Foundations of Math and Pre-Calculus 10

Pre-Calculus 12

Students following the Pre-Calculus pathway will spend more time developing their understanding of symbol manipulation and of generalizations of more sophisticated mathematical concepts. The primary purpose of Pre-Calculus will be to develop the formalism students will need to continue on with the study of Calculus.

The following topics will be covered with an emphasis on developing abstract thinking abilities:

  • Function Transformations
  • Polynomials
  • Radical & Rational Functions
  • Exponential Functions & Logarithms
  • Trigonometric Functions of Angles and Real Numbers
  • Trigonometric Equations & Identities
  • Permutations & Combinations

Prerequisite: Pre-calculus 11

Calculus 12

1: Functions, Graphs, and Limits

  • Limits of Functions (including one-sided limit)Asymptotic and Unbounded Behavior
  • Continuity as a Property of Functions

2: Derivatives

  • Concept of the Derivative
  • Derivative as a Function
  • Second Derivatives
  • Applications of Derivatives
  • Computation of Derivatives

3: Integrals

  • Interpretations and Properties of Definite Integrals
  • Applications of Integrals
  • Fundamental Theorem of CalculusTechniques of Anti differentiation
  • Applications of Anti differentiation
  • Numerical Approximations to Definite Integral

Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus 11

AP Calculus AB

1: Functions, Graphs, and Limits
Limits of Functions (including one-sided limit)
Asymptotic and Unbounded Behavior
Continuity as a Property of Functions

2: Derivatives
Concept of the Derivative
Derivative as a Function
Second Derivatives
Applications of Derivatives
Computation of Derivatives

3: Integrals
Interpretations and Properties of Definite Integrals
Applications of Integrals
Fundamental Theorem of Calculus
Techniques of Anti differentiation
Applications of Anti differentiation
Numerical Approximations to Definite Integral
Differential Equations
Slope fields

Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus 12

AP Calculus BC

This course will cover the following units:

  • Analysis of Graphs
  • Limits of functions, Asymptotes, Continuity, Parametric, polar and vector functions
  • Derivatives
  • Concept of a Derivative, Derivative at a point, Derivative as a function, Second Derivatives, Applications of Derivatives, Computation of Derivatives as a: Power, Exponential Logarithmic, Trigonometric, Inverse Trigonometric, Sum, Product, Quotient, Chain Rule, Implicit Differentiation, Parametric, Polar and Vector Functions
  • Integrals
  • Define integrals, Applications of Integrals, Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, Techniques of Anti-Differentiation, Integration by Parts and Partial Fractions, Applications of Anti-Differentiation, Numerical approximation and Reimann Sums, Differential Equations, Logistic Growth, Eulers Method


Prerequisite:
AP Calculus AB or Pre-Calculus 12 Accelerated

AP Statistics

1: Exploring and understanding data
Displaying categorical data
Sum quantatative data
The standard deviation

2: Exploring relationships between variables
Scatterplots
Linear regression

3:Gathering data and experiment design
Sample survey

4. Randomness and probability
Probability rules
robability models

5. From sample to population
Sampling distributions
Confidence intervals

6. Inferences
Comparing means
Comparing counts
Inferences for regressions

Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus 11 or Pre-calculus 12

Foundations of Math 12

In order to meet the challenges of society, high school graduates must be numerate. Students following this pathway will have opportunities to improve their numeracy skills and concepts. Developing a sense of numeracy will help them to understand how mathematical concepts permeate daily life, business, industry, and government. Students need to be able to use mathematics not just in their work lives, but in their personal lives as citizens and consumers. It is intended that students will learn to value mathematics and become confident in their mathematical abilities.

Foundations of Math is designed for students are intending on studying in the Faculty of Arts at the post-secondary level. It does not prepare the student for calculus. Students must check with University Guidance or the Mathematics Department to see individual university entrance requirements.

This course will cover the following units:

  • Personal Banking
  • Wages and Expenses
  • Spreadsheets
  • Rates, Ratios, and Proportions
  • Trigonometry
  • Geometry
  • Probability & Statistics

Prerequisite: Foundations 11, Pre-Calculus 11

Pre-Calculus 12 Accelerated

This course will cover the following units:

  • Logarithms
  • Trigonometry Part I
  • Trigonometry Part II
  • Limits & Continuity
  • Derivatives
  • Applications of Derivatives


Prerequisite:
Pre-Calculus 11 Accelerated, and approval from the Head of Mathematics.

Advanced Topics in Mathematics

This course will cover the following units:

  • Linear equations, matrices, determinants
  • Introductions to vector spaces and linear transformations and bases
  • Complex numbers
  • Eigenvalues and eigenvectors
  • Diagonalization
  • Inner products and orthogonality
  • Least square problems
  • Applications involving matrix and vector calculations
  • Rectangular, cylindrical and spherical coordinate
  • Vectors, lines, planes, cylinders, quadric surfaces
  • Vector functions, curves, motion in space
  • Differential and integral calculus of several variables
  • Vector fields, line integrals, fundamental theorem for line integrals
  • Green’s theorem


Prerequisite:
AP Calculus BC or approval from the Head of Mathematics

STEM

Design and Technology 8

Design Technology 8 will introduce students to designing and building integrated hardware and software technologies, analyzing, testing, and communicating results. There will be 4 streams that will continue through Grade 9 and broaden to become individual courses by the Grade 10 to 12 level. The 4 streams are: Programming, Robotics, 3D Design, and 2D Image Editing. The focus of each stream will be to present the students with a challenge that requires them to analyze a problem, design and build a hardware or software solution, test and refine their solution, and present their product. Programs used will include: Game Maker, Vex Robot C, AutoCad Tinkercad, Excel, Unity, and Adobe Photoshop.

Prerequisite: None.

Design and Technology 9

Design and Technology 9 will continue with the 4 streams from Design and Technology 8; Programming, Robotics, 3D design, and 2D image editing, although Design and Technology 8 is not a prerequisite. One focus of the year will be to introduce the students to various multimedia software applications during the design stream. These will be pulled from the worlds of website design, digital imaging, and animation. Specific software and applications examined may include: digital image capturing and editing using Adobe Photoshop, 2-D animation using Flash CS4, computer based drawing and design using AutoDesk TinkerCAD. Another focus will be programming using a game design engine and RobotC.

All work will be project based with students expected to apply concepts and techniques learned in class to specific challenges. This will rely heavily on the student's ability to explore the hardware and software both through the class lessons and on their own, and apply this knowledge to their work.

Prerequisite: None.

Multimedia 11

Multimedia 11 will introduce students to some new areas of multimedia software applications and continue work in areas examined in Multimedia 9. These will be pulled from the worlds of web site design, digital imaging, and animation to name a few. Specific software and applications examined may include: Web site design and development using Dreamweaver CS4, 2-D animation using Flash CS4, digital image capturing and editing using Adobe Photoshop, computer based drawing and design using Adobe Illustrator CS4 and finally 3-D Character Design using Maya 2010.

All work will be project based with students expected to apply concepts and techniques learned in class to specific assignments. This will rely heavily on the student's ability to explore the software both through the class lessons and on their own and apply this knowledge to their work. All projects will be done in class time and with deadlines appropriate to the project. No homework will be assigned.

Prerequisite: Design and Technology 9 or approval from the teacher.

Multimedia 12 Animation

Multimedia 12 - Maya will open up the amazing world of 3-D Computer Animation to any student looking for the fun and challenge this field provides. Using the same modeling and animation software used to create Shrek, and Avatar, students will learn concepts like:

- The fundamentals of animation including Path Animation, Keyframing and Non-Linear animation
- Lighting, Texturing and Rendering of scenes and animations
- Camera techniques and camera animation
- Special Effects such as particle emitters and light effects

Work in animation will build off of the Modeling work performed in Multimedia 11. A review of this material will occur in class and will serve to refine students modeling skills. Assignments will help to walk students through the material. Course work will include Adobe Photoshop to help in texturing scenes and models, and video editing with Adobe Premiere to enable the animated projects to be compiled into movie format.

All work will be project based and will involve work both individually and in groups. Students are expected to apply concepts and techniques learned in class to specific assignments. This will rely heavily on the student's work ethic. Students will be expected to explore the software both through the class lessons and on their own and apply this knowledge to their work. All projects will be done in class time and with deadlines appropriate to the project. No homework will be assigned.

Prerequisite: Multimedia 11.

AP Computer Science Principles 12

AP Computer Science Principles (CSP) is an entry-level course that introduces students to the foundations of modern computing. The curriculum itself does not assume any prior knowledge of computing concepts before entering the course; though knowledge of basic algebra is assumed. The course covers a broad range of foundational topics such as programming, algorithms, the Internet, big data, digital privacy and security, and the societal impacts of computing. Students will be assessed through quizzes, project rubrics, group work, tests, and performance tasks. As part of the AP requirement, student submit Create and Explore tasks by the end of April and write an AP exam in May.

Major units of study include:

  • Digital Information
  • The Internet
  • Introduction to Algorithms and Programming
  • Big Data: research and privacy
  • Building Apps
  • Create and Explore tasks

Prerequisite: Students must have completed Math 10


AP Computer Science A 12

Students will use the Java computer language to prepare for the AP computer science exam.

The topics covered will be:

  • Control structures
  • Classes and objects
  • Interfaces
  • Arrays
  • ArrayLists
  • Inheritance and classes
  • Streams and files
  • Recursion
  • Binary search trees “Big-O” analysis of algorithms and sorting methods

Prerequisite: AP Computer Principles or teacher recommendation.

Robotics 11 and 12

The robotics competitions provide a unique opportunity for the development of creativity, critical thinking and problem-solving skills, effective communication, collaboration and teamwork. Throughout the preparatory stages the students will experience workplace skills such as goal setting, independent research, basic programming and building skills. The finished projects will provide the students with a great sense of accomplishment which can strengthen their self-confidence and motivation to excel in everything they do.

This course is designed as an interdisciplinary study which requires knowledge of basic mathematics, programming, physics, design, economics, sportsmanship and global issues. The competitions run at different levels from provincial, regional, national to international events. Students will enrich their ‘gaming’ experience by participating in all levels and by increasing their awareness of the many aspects of Robotics design and functionality.

Units of study include research, programming, building, testing, adjusting, retesting and competing. In-class and school wide competitions will be held throughout the year to provide the students with the opportunity to practice their robotics skills before competing outside of the school. At the end of the course the students should be competent in programming, building, driving and manipulating the various aspects of the robot.

Prerequisite: Grade 11 or 12 with exceptional attitude and teamwork skills.

Science

Science 8

Science 8 focuses on students learning various core competencies specific to science while focusing on content specific to biology, physics, chemistry and geology. The curricular competencies focus on: questioning and predicting, planning and conducting, processing and analyzing data and information, evaluating, applying and innovating, and communicating. The first unit is Biology during which students will develop an understanding of cells as the basic unit as life. They will also learn about the basic functions of the immune system, how vaccinations and antibiotics work, as well as the impact of epidemics and pandemics on the human population. The second unit is Chemistry in which students use the kinetic molecular theory to explain the characteristics of solids, liquids and gases, as well as learn the basic structure of the atom. The third unit in Science 8 is Physical Science: Optics, in which the knowledge and behaviour of waves, properties of light and other types of electromagnetic radiation will be studied. During this unit, students also study the properties of light by designing and building pinhole cameras and developing their own photos; this study becomes part of the school wide Science Expo. The fourth unit is Geology where students will explore plate tectonics and the different layers of the Earth. Within all of these units, students will develop place-based knowledge about the area in which they live, learning about and building on Aboriginal knowledge and other traditional knowledge of the area. This provides a basis for an intuitive relationship with and respect for the natural world; connections to their ecosystem and community; and a sense of relatedness that encourages lifelong harmony with nature (Ministry of Education, 2015). For example, students take part in a cross curricular study called the "Watershed Project" in which they study various issues surrounding water, including the Pacific Salmon.

Prerequisite: Science 7

Science 9

Science 9 focuses on students learning various science-specific core competencies while learning content specific to life sciences, chemistry, physics and ecosystems. The curricular competencies focus on: questioning and predicting, planning and conducting, processing and analyzing data and information, evaluating, applying and innovating, and communicating. The first main focus is Life Science in which students learn about asexual and sexual reproduction, which develops student understanding about cell division (mitosis and meiosis). The second main topic is Chemistry in which students learn about atoms, elements and compounds. We focus on the periodic table and how elements are organized along the periodic table. The third main topic is Physics in which circuits must be complete for electrons to flow and the relatedness between voltage, current and resistance are the focus of study. The fourth major topic is Ecosystems, in which students learn the effects of solar radiation on the cycling of matter and energy, how matter cycles within ecosystems and sustainability of systems, including aboriginal perspectives on interconnectedness. To enhance this unit and use the scientific method, the students complete a Science Expo project on ‘Engineering Inspired by Nature’, where they solve a human challenge by using nature's designs.

Prerequisite: Science 8

Science 10

The Science 10 course covers the four core areas of science: chemistry, physics, biology and earth science. Throughout the course the processes of science will be emphasized, as students use safe procedures and appropriate scientific technologies to perform experiments using the scientific method. They will learn to represent and interpret information graphically, as well as improve their scientific literacy. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship between scientific principles and technology. At all times, students will be expected to demonstrate ethical, responsible and cooperative behaviour. In the life science section of the course, students will investigate the interaction of abiotic and biotic factors within an ecosystem, assess the potential impacts of bioaccumulation, and explain various ways in which natural populations are altered or kept in equilibrium. In chemistry, students will: learn to differentiate between atoms, ions, and molecules; classify substances as acids, bases, or salts, based on their characteristics, name, and formula; distinguish between organic and inorganic compounds; analyze chemical reactions, including reference to conservation of mass and rate of reaction; and explain radioactivity using modern atomic theory. In physics the main topics are the relationship of displacement and time interval to velocity for objects in uniform motion; and the relationship between velocity, time interval, and acceleration. In earth and space science, students will: explain the characteristics and sources of thermal energy; explain the effects of thermal energy within the atmosphere; evaluate possible causes of climate change and its impact on natural systems; analyze the processes and features associated with plate tectonics; and demonstrate knowledge of evidence that supports plate tectonic theory.

Prerequisite: Science 9

Science 10 Enriched

The Science 10 Enriched course covers the four core areas of science: chemistry, physics, biology and earth science. Students will study the core curriculum as set out by the ministry but with extension in chemistry, physics and biology in preparation for Advanced Placement courses. Throughout the course the processes of science will be emphasized, as students use safe procedures and appropriate scientific technologies to perform experiments using the scientific method. They will learn to represent and interpret information graphically, as well as improve their scientific literacy. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship between scientific principles and technology. At all times, students will be expected to demonstrate ethical, responsible and cooperative behaviour. In the life science section of the course, students will investigate the interaction of abiotic and biotic factors within an ecosystem, assess the potential impacts of bioaccumulation, and explain various ways in which natural populations are altered or kept in equilibrium. In chemistry, students will: learn to differentiate between atoms, ions, and molecules; classify substances as acids, bases, or salts, based on their characteristics, name, and formula; distinguish between organic and inorganic compounds; analyze chemical reactions, including reference to conservation of mass and rate of reaction; and explain radioactivity using modern atomic theory. In physics the main topics are the relationship of displacement and time interval to velocity for objects in uniform motion; and the relationship between velocity, time interval, and acceleration. In earth and space science, students will: explain the characteristics and sources of thermal energy; explain the effects of thermal energy within the atmosphere; evaluate possible causes of climate change and its impact on natural systems; analyze the processes and features associated with plate tectonics; and demonstrate knowledge of evidence that supports plate tectonic theory. Students will complete a science expo project that will allow them to engage in an area of science of their choosing and conduct an experiment or innovation by following the scientific method.

Prerequisite: Science 9 with an A grade, 86%, or the permission of the Head of Science. A good work ethic.

Chemistry 11

Chemistry 11 provides an introduction to the field of chemistry in the form of seven interrelated study units.

The course begins with a unit on compound naming and significant figures. Then the mole is developed to link macroscopic measures of matter to the atoms and molecules of chemical reactions. Relationships among the particles of a chemical reaction are developed in the unit on stoichiometry.

In the solution chemistry unit, molarity is used to relate volume measurements to reaction stoichiometry and compound solubility is investigated qualitatively. The gas laws are developed and the molar volume is used to related gas volume to stoichiometry.

Ideas of atomic structure are taught and used to explain chemical bonding.

Organic chemistry is introduced through discussion of basic chain structure and common functional groups.

Prerequisite: Science 10 with a minimum B standing is recommended.

Chemistry 11 Enriched

Chemistry 11 Enriched provides an introduction to the field of chemistry in the form of eight interrelated study units. It is a conceptual course which requires strong mathematical abilities.

The course begins with a unit on compound naming and significant figures. Then the mole is developed to link macroscopic measures of matter to the atoms and molecules of chemical reactions. Relationships among the particles of a chemical reaction are developed in the unit on stoichiometry. In the solution chemistry unit, molarity is used to relate volume measurements to reaction stoichiometry and compound solubility is investigated qualitatively. The gas laws are developed and the molar volume is used to related gas volume to stoichiometry. Ideas of atomic structure are taught and used to explain chemical bonding. Organic chemistry is introduced through discussion of basic chain structure and common functional groups.

Prerequisite: Science 10 Enriched with a minimum 86% standing or the permission of the Head of Science. Pre-Calculus Eleven is a strongly recommended co-requisite.

Earth Sciences 11

Earth Sciences 11 is a descriptive course that provides an overview of scientifically established knowledge about the universe and the earth.

In the astroscience unit, the following ideas are explored:

  • the size, age and development of the universe; the nature of stars, galaxies and other structures; methods of information acquisition;
  • the sun and solar system; differences and similarities among the planets; the moon; the earth as a planetary body

In the geology unit, the following ideas are explored:

  • the size and shape of the earth, minerals, formation of rocks and mineral resources;
  • forces that alter the surface such as weathering, water and ice
  • volcanism and plate tectonics
  • dating method

In the atmospheric science unit, the following ideas are explored:

  • the nature of air and the structure of the atmosphere; response to effects of heat and water;
  • air pressure; air masses, storms and climate

In the oceanography unit, the following ideas are explored:

  • the nature of sea water; temperature and density effects on sea water
  • the geology of the sea floor and continental margins


Prerequisite:
Science 10

Life Sciences 11

This is a survey course covering various aspects of biology with a very large practical component.

Adaptation and evolution is studied as a unit and is then referred to and related to all of the organisms studied throughout the course.
In microbiology students become aware of many interesting aspects of viruses. Bacteria and Archaea are examined as examples of prokaryotic cells. Many laboratory activities are carried out to improve the students understanding of these microbes. Organisms of the Kingdom Protista are investigated microscopically so as to understand their structure and function. In plant biology green algae, mosses, ferns, gymnosperms and angiosperms are studied. With all of these, their life cycles are examined and they are compared to each other while reference is made to their evolutionary position. In animal biology students have the opportunity to study sponges, cnidarians, flatworms, roundworms, segmented worms, molluscs, echinoderms, arthropods, and chordates.

Ecology is referred to at every level. More specifically population dynamics and energy flow are studied. Students have the opportunity to collect and interpret data about a specific environmental issue.

Prerequisite: Science 10 and a curious interest in biological sciences.

Life Sciences 11 Enriched

Themes in the study of life.

The cell cycle and its regulation.

Genetics - including meiosis and gametogenesis.

Evolutionary Biology - including early evolution of life; evidence for evolution; mechanisms of evolution

Diversity of Organisms - including evolutionary patterns, survey of the diversity of life; phylogenetic classification; evolutionary relationships.

Ecology - including population dynamics, communities and ecosystems, global issues

The Life Sciences 11 Enriched course covers all Life Sciences 11 topics as prescribed by the BC Ministry of Education while also preparing students for the AP Biology 12 course. The new AP Biology curriculum is framed around four big ideas which permeate the curriculum.

Big idea one ‘The process of evolution drives the diversity and unity of life.’ Will be covered at the AP level and will only be briefly reviewed in grade 12.

Big idea two and four include ecology as part of their content. The ecology section will also be covered at the AP level and only be briefly reviewed in grade 12.

Asexual and Sexual Reproduction, including mitosis and meiosis are also covered at the AP level.

Prerequisite: Science 10 Enriched. An 86% (A standing) is recommended. All applications will be reviewed by the Head of Science and the Science 10 Enriched teacher.

Exemptions: Students that have completed Science 10 with an A standing will be considered on completion of the required criteria presented by the Head of Science. These criteria must be completed before students will be allowed into this course. These criteria are presented in an attempt to bring the students in line with students that have completed Science 10 Enriched. A curious interest in biological science and a very good work ethic are essential.

Physics 11

The Physics 11 course will: (1) Introduce the main ideas, principles and underlying concepts of physics. (2) Give students an understanding of the analytical and experimental methods of inquiry used in physics. The course provides ample opportunity for the development of skills in these areas. (3) Present an introductory physics course suitable to the interest and abilities of a fairly wide range of students. (4) Prepare students for a more rigorous follow-up course suitable for students who have particular interest in physics or who plan to continue in science or engineering.

Topics include the following:

  • Foundations for Physics (measurement & graphical analysis)
  • Kinematics in One Dimension
  • Projectile Motion
  • Dynamics in One Dimension (Forces and Newton’s Laws and Momentum
  • Energy, Work, and Power
  • Electrostatics
  • Circuits
  • Waves and Sound
  • Light and Optics
  • Topics in Modern Physics (Relativity)

Prerequisite: Science 10 and Foundations and Pre-Calculus 10

AP Physics 1

AP Physics 1 is an algebra-based, introductory college-level physics course that explores the following topics through inquiry based learning. Students will continue to develop scientific critical thinking and reasoning skills.

AP Physics 1

  • Kinematics
  • Dynamics: Newton’s laws
  • Circular Motion and Universal Law of Gravitation
  • Simple Harmonic Motion: Simple Pendulum and Mass-Spring Systems
  • Impulse, Linear Momentum, and Conservation of Linear Momentum: Collisions
  • Work, Energy, and Conservation of Energy
  • Rotational Motion, Torque, Rotational Kinematics and Energy, Rotational Dynamics, and Conservation of Angular Momentum
  • Electrostatics: Electric Charge and Electric Force
  • DC Circuits: Resistors only
  • Mechanical Waves and Sound

AP Physics 1 is a fast-paced course and a pre-requisite to AP Physics 2 and AP Physics C. Normally students in the AP stream would take this course in Grade 11. Students enrolled in this course will receive the AP Physics Honours 11 credit. They will write the AP examination in May. Post AP examination, students will study additional topics in preparation for the Physics Honours 11 exam in June. The June exam will count for 30% of their total AP Physics Honours 11 grade.

Prerequisite:

1. Science 10 Enriched (at Collingwood) or Physics 11

2. Foundations and Pre-Calculus 10

Anatomy and Physiology 12

In the Processes of Science students will; demonstrate safe and correct technique for a variety of laboratory procedures, design an experiment using the scientific method, interpret data from a variety of text and visual sources.
Students will study Biochemistry (Cell Compounds and Biological Molecules), Cell Structure and Function, DNA Replication, Protein Synthesis, Transport across Cell Membrane, analyze the roles of enzymes in biochemical reactions. In Human Biology students study the Digestive System Circulatory System, Respiratory System, Nervous System, Urinary System, Reproductive System.

Prerequisite:
Biology 11
Chemistry 11 highly recommended.
Students in Grade 12 who have not completed Biology 11 and wish to study Biology 12 require the permission of the Science Head of Department and the Senior Biology teacher before being accepted into this course.

AP Biology 12

The AP Biology course is prescribed by the College Board to include four big ideas.

1. The process of evolution drives the diversity and unity of life.

2. Biological systems utilize free energy and molecular building blocks to grow, to reproduce, and to maintain dynamic homeostasis.

3. Living systems store, retrieve, transmit, and respond to information essential to life processes.

4. Biological systems interact, and these systems and their interactions possess complex properties.

Prerequisite:

Life Sciences 11 Enriched, Chemistry 11 and permission of the Head of Science.
Students who wish to enter AP Biology 12 without taking the Biology 11 Enriched prerequisite will be required to complete the Biology 11Enriched course challenge and as part of this they will write an entrance exam based on the Biology 11 Enriched curriculum. They will only be allowed to enter the course with the permission of the Head of Science.

Chemistry 12

Chemistry 12 is a continuation on the concepts of chemistry eleven. It is a sequential course, with information building on itself such that the concepts at the start of the class will be used throughout the year to develop new ideas.
Chemistry 12 is a conceptual course with some complex mathematics. Pre-Calculus 12 is an important concurrent course to take and many of the ideas covered in this math course are also used in Chemistry 12 . It requires a strong conceptual mind, with an ability to visualize ideas much like mathematics does.

The topics covered in the course include the following:

Unit 1: Kinetics - rates of reactions
Unit 2: Dynamic equilibrium - reversible reactions
Unit 3: Solubility equilibrium - quantitative solubility
Unit 4: Acid base equilibrium - quantitative acid/base interactions and applications
Unit 5: Redox - oxidation and reduction, the transfer of electrons during chemical reactions.

Chemistry 12 is a rigorous course. Students should anticipate one hour of work outside of class for every hour in class.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 11 with 68% minimum, but a "B" (73%) is strongly recommended.

Environmental Science 12

The goal of the Environmental Science 12 course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them.

Environmental science 12 is interdisciplinary, embracing a wide variety of topics from different areas of study; biology, economics, earth science, chemistry, environmental law and social science. The big ideas that will be covered include:

1. Human actions affect the quality of water and its ability to sustain life

2. Human activities cause changes in the global climate system.

3. Sustainable land use is essential to meet the needs of a growing population.

4. Living sustainably supports the well-being of self, community, and Earth.

In teaching the course we aim to equip students to deal with environmental issues in a rational and realistic manner regardless of their career choice.

Students who are taking Advanced Placement Environmental Science will also be in the class, and will be working independently outside of class time to prepare themselves for the AP Exam in May.

Prerequisite: A grade 11 Science course with at least a B grade, or taking a grade 11 science course with an A grade in Science 10, a very good work ethic and a keen interest in environmental issues. Students will enter this course with the permission of the Head of Science.


AP Environmental Science

The goal of the AP Environmental Science course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them.

Students will also get credit for the new provincial course called Environmental Sciences 12, as this curriculum will be covered as well.

AP Environmental students will be expected to cover some of the content of the AP curriculum on their own time outside of class.

AP Environmental science is interdisciplinary, embracing a wide variety of topics from different areas of study; biology, economics, earth science, chemistry, environmental law and social science. There are several major unifying themes that cut across the many topics included in the study of the course. The following is a list of the main topics studied in the AP Environmental Science course: the flow of energy, the cycling of matter, the solid earth, the atmosphere, the biosphere, human population dynamics, renewable and non-renewable resources, environmental quality, environmental law, global changes and their consequences, environment and society; trade offs and decision making.

In teaching the course we aim to equip students to deal with environmental issues in a rational and realistic manner regardless of their career choice.

Prerequisite: A grade 11 Science course with at least a B grade, or taking a grade 11 science course with an A grade in Science 10, a very good work ethic and a keen interest in environmental issues. Students will enter this course with the permission of the Head of Science.

Geology 12

The course introduces Geology through four major topics: Earth Materials, Geologic Time, Internal Processes and Plate Tectonics, and Superficial Processes. Much of Geology 12 is taught through laboratory work which includes identifying many samples of minerals, rocks and fossils and working with practical applications of earth’s processes. In third term, students will prepare a geologic resource project as an in depth study of the sources, environmental impact and social uses of a chosen resource. A field trip designed to explore the geologically fascinating region of the Sea to Sky highway will serve as a final course review.

Prerequisite: Earth Science 11 is recommended.

Organic Chemistry

Organic Chemistry is an important course for students who are entering the post-secondary fields of chemistry, biology, pharmacy, and health-sciences. At the post-secondary level, Organic Chemistry is generally introduced in second year (it is typically a 200 level course), after students have taken a general, introductory chemistry class in first year. Many students find this post-secondary chemistry course to be very challenging, and it typically has a low success rate. This is not just true in Canada, but in the United States and the UK as well. It is a required course for students completing a chemistry degree, of course, but it is also required as a prerequisite for most biology and some health-sciences degrees as well. Many students who are studying life sciences find the course particularly hard, and it is often known as the course that blocks a significant number of biology and health-science students from pursuing this field of study.

Conceptually, the topics follow on some of the ideas covered in Chemistry 11, but there are also some ideas that are covered in Chemistry 12 that will be important to understand. As such, Chemistry 11 is the pre-requisite for Organic Chemistry, but it is strongly recommended that Chemistry 12 is completed before beginning Organic Chemistry. Students will need to do some extra work to catch up if they only have Chemistry 11.

The main topics that will be covered are synthesized from the topics that are covered by North American and UK post-secondary institutions, and are as follows:

Unit 1: Review of shapes and structures of organic compounds
Unit 2: Molecular Structure and Molecular Orbital Theory
Unit 3: Introduction to Organic Reactions
Unit 4: Organic Addition Reactions
Unit 5: Stereochemistry and Chirality of Organic Compounds
Unit 6: Nucleophillic Substitution Reactions at Saturated Carbons
Unit 7: Organic Elimination Reactions
Unit 8: The Reactions of the Carbonyl Group
Unit 9: The Reactions of Electrophillic groups with Organic compounds
Unit 10: Spectroscopy

Prerequisite: Chemistry 11 (Chemistry 12 strongly recommended)

AP Chemistry 12

AP Chemistry is a continuation on the concepts of chemistry eleven. It is a sequential course, with information building on itself such that the concepts at the start of the class will be used throughout the year to develop new ideas.
AP Chemistry is a conceptual course with some complex mathematics. Pre-Calculus 12 is an important concurrent course to take. It requires a strong conceptual mind, with the ability to visualize ideas.

The topics covered in the course include the following:
Unit 1: Thermodynamics - the energy changes during chemical reactions and physical changes
Unit 2: Kinetics - rates of reactions
Unit 3: Dynamic equilibrium - reversible reactions
Unit 4: Solubility equilibrium - quantitative solubility
Unit 5: Acid base equilibrium - quantitative acid/base concentrations
Unit 6: Redox - oxidation and reduction, the transfer of electrons during chemical reactions.

Prerequisite: A minimum of 80% in Chemistry 11 Enriched, or permission of the Head of Science.
Corequisite: Pre-Calculus 12

Physics 12

Physics 12 is an extension of the Physics 11 course. It takes some topics to a greater depth and introduces some new topics. It provides a more rigorous treatment than Physics 11. It is a course suitable for students who have a particular interest in physics or who plan to continue in science or engineering.

  • Vector Kinematics in Two Dimensions (Vectors and relative velocity, motion with constant acceleration)
  • Dynamics (Forces)
  • Vector Dynamics (Two dimensional dynamics)
  • Work, Energy and Power.
  • Momentum (One and Two Dimensional )
  • Static Equilibrium
  • Circular Motion and the Universal Law of Gravitation
  • Electrostatics (Electric force and electric field, electric potential energy and electric potential)
  • Electric circuits (Ohm's law and Kirchhoff's laws, power and energy)
  • Electromagnetism (Magnetic forces, electromagnetic induction)

Prerequisite: Physics 11

AP Physics 2

AP Physics 2 is an algebra-based, introductory college-level physics course that explores the following topics through inquiry based learning. Students will continue to develop scientific critical thinking and reasoning skills.

AP Physics 2

  • Thermodynamics: Laws of Thermodynamics, Ideal Gases, and Kinetic Theory
  • Fluid States and Dynamics
  • Electrostatics: Electric Force, Electric Field and Electric Potential
  • DC Circuits and RC Circuits (Steady-state only)
  • Magnetism and Electromagnetic Induction
  • Geometric and Physical Optics
  • Quantum Physics, Atomic and Nuclear Physics

Students enrolled in this course will write the AP examination in May and the Physics Honours 12 school exam in June. Students will receive credit for Physics Honours 12 (APPHH12) upon successful completion of AP Physics 2 and the school exam.

Prerequisite: AP Physics 1

AP Physics C

AP Physics C matches a year-long university-level course in mechanics and electromagnetism. It is designed for students who plan to study science or engineering. Because it is a prerequisite for advanced study, the treatment of the subject material is thorough and rigorous. The Physics AP course is divided into two parts: Mechanics and Electromagnetism.

AP Physics is a demanding course. Students must cover a large amount of material and it is essential that this material is mastered as it is covered. Classroom and laboratory time tend to be high in intensity and fast-paced. Homework generally consists of reading and problem-solving. Problems tend to be those involving higher-order thinking skills.

The main topics to be covered are as follows:

  • Kinematics
  • Newton 's laws of motion
  • Work, Energy and Power
  • Systems of Particles
  • Rotation
  • Oscillations
  • Gravitation
  • Electrostatics
  • Conductors, Capacitors and Dielectrics
  • Electric Circuits
  • Magnetism
  • Electromagnetism

Prerequisite:

AP Physics 1 and any Calculus 12 course

OR

AP Physics 1, Calculus Challenge*, and enrolled in any Calculus 12 course.

*Must obtain permission from Head of Science. Calculus challenge must be successfully completed before starting AP Physics C.

Social Studies

Social Studies 8

In Social Studies 8 students will learn about civilizations within the time period of the 7th Century to 1750. Of emphasis will be expansion, exploration and subsequent colonization of areas in Europe, Asia and the Americas. Classrooms will address topics like struggles for power, competition for resources, exchanges of ideas, and with that, the impacts to culture and civilizations moving forward. Mapping and geography skills will be emphasized throughout the year embedded in the units of study. In class, students will be taught historical thinking skills such as, but are not limited to, analysis, interpretation, compare, contrast, assessing historical significance and exercising ethical judgements. Overall as our world is complex and globalized, Social Studies 8 will help students to make better sense of today’s world.

Prerequisite: Social Studies 7.

Social Studies 9

Social Studies 9 covers the historical time period from 1750 to 1905. Students will study the Enlightenment Thinkers, the American Revolution, the French Revolution, the Seven Years' War, and Pre and Post-Confederation Canada. As well, First Nations and Metis history will be emphasized as major events such as the signing of the Treaties, the creation of Residential schools, Red River and Northwest Rebellions occurred during this time period. In class, students will be taught historical thinking skills such as, but are not limited to, analysis, interpretation, compare, contrast, assessing historical significance and exercising ethical judgements. In Social Studies 9, students will be asked to think about the big ideas of emerging ideas influence society, the physical environment influences the nature of change, disparities in power alter the balance of relationships, and collective identity is constructed and can change over time. Overall as our world is complex and globalized, Social Studies 9 will help students to make better sense of today’s world.

Prerequisite: Social Studies 8.

Social Studies 10

Social Studies 10 covers the historical time period from 1900 to the present. This course provides students with the knowledge and skills they need to participate effectively as citizens of Canada and as members of the larger global community. This course emphasizes Canada’s participation in twentieth century history, human geography and the environment, and the structure of the Canadian federal government. In class, students will be taught historical thinking skills such as, but are not limited to, analysis, interpretation, compare, contrast, assessing historical significance and exercising ethical judgements. Finally, in Social Studies 10 students will be asked to think about and work with the big ideas of: the lasting effects of conflict, how political organizations develop, how interaction between individuals and groups influence political and societal change, and how developments in Canadian society can be viewed in many different ways.

Prerequisite: Social Studies 9.

20th Century World History 12

20th Century World History 12, as described by the British Columbia Ministry of Education, is a survey course extending from the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917 to the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991, and exploring significant political, social, and economic events during this period within a “Western” or “Trans-Atlantic” frame of reference to 1945 and an international frame of reference from 1945-1991.

The years 1917 to 1991 were dominated by the effects of two world wars: including the decline of European power, the rise and demise of fascism, the ideological polarization during the Cold War, the end of colonial empires, and the emergence of a new geopolitical era heading into the 21st century. They were years of significant economic, social, political, cultural and technological change.

The organization, content, and orientation of the curriculum all reflect the goals of intellectual and social development and critical thinking in addition to the acquisition of historical knowledge.

Prerequisite: Social Studies 10

Global Issues Through Debate 12

Global Issues Through Debate is an inquiry-based, debate-centered interdisciplinary course that is grounded in the belief that educated people who are able to think critically and communicate effectively can make tangible differences in our world. Through the complementary disciplines of the social sciences, students will use a variety of text-types--newspapers, newsmagazines, databases, podcasts, documentaries, and more--to understand that issues have social, political, economic, historic, and geographic components, and that considering multiple perspectives is a necessary step in working towards any possible solutions. Central to this course is the spoken argument. With standards-based assessment to guide skills acquisition, students will engage in both discussion-based learning and formal debating. Using a variety of debate styles including cross-examination, Canadian National Debate Format, and World Style Debate, students’ will solidify their understandings by developing their ability to think critically “on the spot”, and will be encouraged to participate in a local debate tournament. Beyond its interdisciplinary links to other courses in the social sciences, this course also has co-curricular links to Service Learning, Model UN, Debate, and more.

Prerequisite: Social Studies 10

Law Studies 12

Law Studies 12 introduces students to the fundamentals of Canadian law and strives to develop the student's understanding of the underlying legal principles, rights and responsibilities that define our society. The course begins with an examination of the historical foundations of law, the present legal system in Canada, the rights and freedoms established by the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, criminal and civil law, and the law and its effects on the family.

Using case studies, current legal events, guest speakers and a mock trial, students have the opportunity to see both what the law is and how it works in practice. The course also examines the changing role of law in our society and the strengths and weaknesses of our current legal system. This course requires students to utilize and develop both their analytical and communicative skills.

Prerequisite: Social Studies 10

Physical Geography 12

Physical Geography 12 uses the interdisciplinary geographic tradition to address concerns of both physical and human environments and their interrelationships. The Physical Geography 12 curriculum examines many of the characteristics, processes, distributions, and interactions among the physical components of the earth's surface. The following topics are studied in this course: the world as a system; geographic spheres; topographic maps and mapping skills; rock formation; continental drift and plate tectonics; weathering and erosion; weather phenomena, climate controls and world climate patterns; soils and vegetation; cultural patterns of resource development.

Prerequisite: Social Studies 10.

Philosophy 12

Philosophy 12 examines the fundamental nature of knowledge, reality, and existence. Students will learn tools to investigate what is "truth", discover the meaning of life, and foster an understanding of different methods of thinking and solving problems that have faced humanity for thousands of years. Philosophy 12 will explain how logic and reason can show which answers have more or less value. Students will investigate their own assumptions and preconceived notions. Finally, through discussion and debate, individual beliefs and views will be challenged and explored. Topics covered include: logic and rational argumentation, individualism, identity and the self, reality versus appearance, utilitarianism, virtue ethics and social justice.

Prerequisite: Social Studies 10

AP Economics 12

AP Economics 12 is divided into two halves: Microeconomics and Macroeconomics, and each course grants four credits. The purpose of the AP course in Microeconomics is to give students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual decision makers, both consumers and producers, within the larger economic system. It places primary emphasis on the nature and functions of product markets and includes the study of factor markets and the role of the government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy.

In Macroeconomics, the principles of economics apply to an economic system as a whole. Such a course places particular emphasis on the study of national income and price determination, and also develops students' familiarity with economic performance measures, economic growth, and international economics.

Corequisite: Social Studies 10

AP European History 12

AP European History 12 is a survey course in European and world history covering the period from 1450 to the present. As an Advanced Placement course, the credit received is equivalent to that of a first year university course. A variety of approaches are employed in this course. The material is taught both thematically and chronologically in order to explore most expediently numerous topics of social, economic, cultural, intellectual and political relevance. The students will write the Advanced Placement European History 12 Examination in May.

Upon completion of the AP European History 12 exam, students will continue to learn about twentieth century history and write the 20th Century World History 12 final exam during the June exam period.

Prerequisite: Social Studies 10

AP Human Geography 12

AP Human Geography 12 invites you to consider questions that are fundamentally intriguing to us as human beings: Where are humans and activities located across Earth’s surface? Why do humans do what we do where we do it? What interrelationships exist between humans and the physical environment? Essentially, in APHG we ask why, where, and why there? The course also introduces you relatively gently to the rigours of university studies and provides you with a valuable framework for understanding the world around you. You will learn to think, write, interpret, and create as geographers.

The AP Human Geography 12 course offered by the Advanced Placement program is equivalent to an introductory one-semester course at the college or university level. The course is organized into seven topics presented as separate units of study and increasingly integrated as you expand both your knowledge and skills: geography - its nature and perspective; population; cultural patterns and processes; political organization of space; agriculture, food production, and rural land use; industrial and economic development; and cities and urban land use.

We use a variety of approaches in the course: inquiry-based learning; lectures; videos; case studies; field work; field trips; and discussion. AP Human Geography 12 offers students the opportunity to be well-informed about the world today and to tackle challenging university-level material while still in high school.

Prerequisite: 86% or better in Social Studies 9 or completion of Social Studies 10

AP Psychology 12

The purpose of the AP Psychology 12 course is to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behaviour and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles and phenomena associated with each of the major sub fields within psychology. They also learn about the methods psychologists use in their science and practice.

Prerequisite: Social Studies 10

AP World History 12

The primary focus of AP World History 12 is the study of different types of societies, their development over time, and their interactions with other societies. It is a truly global study of human history, covering the chronological time frame from 8000 BCE to the present. By applying historical thinking skills, the course is designed to develop students’ capacity and ability to think and reason in a deeper, more systematic way, better preparing them for subsequent college courses. The AP World History 12 course content is structured around the investigation of course themes and key concepts in six different chronological periods.

Specific course objectives include the following:

  1. Analyze the complex interplay among social, economic, cultural and religious forces that have shaped the modern world.
  2. Examine cause-and-effect relationships within an historical setting.
  3. Foster a mature, grounded perspective with which to assess contemporary issues and events.
  4. Appreciate cultural artifacts such as painting, sculpture, architecture, literature, photography, and film.
  5. Hone analytical reading, writing, and thinking skills.
  6. Provide experience with a college-level curriculum.
  7. Prepare for the AP World History 12 exam.

Prerequisite: Social Studies 10

Because of the broad scope of this course, it is strongly recommended that students enrolling in AP World History 12 have already taken at least one other AP course in the Social Studies department. As well, strong skills and interest in reading and writing are essential.

Physical Education

Physical Education 8

The goal of the Collingwood Physical Education program is to develop and promote concepts of fitness, teamwork, sportsmanship and healthy life skills. This is accomplished through cardiovascular and strength training, skill development and the promotion of active life styles through a wide variety of sports and activities.

Units at the school will vary. Students may have the opportunity to partake in classes off-campus, as well as have guest instructors visit the class throughout the year.

Prerequisite: Physical Education 7

Physical Education 9

The goal of the Collingwood Physical Education program is to develop and promote concepts of fitness, teamwork, sportsmanship and healthy life skills. This is accomplished through cardiovascular and strength training, skill development and the promotion of active life styles through a wide variety of sports and activities.
Units offered at the school will vary throughout the year. Students may have the opportunity to partake in activities off-campus and have external specialist instructors visit the class.

Prerequisite: Physical Education 8

Physical Education High Performance 9

Sport Specific Training: Skills, Strategies & Tactics specific to the major sport the athlete is involved in. Approximately one third of class time.

Multi-Sport Training: Various cross-training activities and games designed to improve student’s overall athletic ability and game understanding. Approximately one third of class time.

Fitness: Agility, Power & Speed, Strength, Flexibility, Aerobic Fitness, Anaerobic Fitness, FMS Testing/Building. Approximately one third of class time.

Academic: Biomechanics, Sport Nutrition, Mental Skills, Goal Setting, Rules and Regulations, Possible Coaching Certification. Implemented throughout the year on a constant basis as part of lessons.

Grouping: Dependent on numbers registered

Prerequisite: Physical Education 8, Completion of Application Form

Physical Education 10

The goal of the Collingwood Physical Education program is to develop and promote concepts of fitness, teamwork, sportsmanship and healthy life skills. The focus of Grade 10 P.E. is on life long recreational activities. This is accomplished through cardiovascular and strength training, skill development and the promotion of active life styles through a wide variety of sports and activities.

During PE 10 there is a strong emphasis on participation and the application of leadership within the class as well as the school setting. Students will participate in traditional sport units, go on field trips to local fitness centers, and have guest instructors. Students will be expected to lead a series of lessons for their peers, in small groups. As part of Ministry of Education requirements, students will also complete Basic First Aid training.

Prerequisite: Physical Education 9

Physical Education High Performance 10

Sport Specific Training: Skills, Strategies & Tactics specific to the major sport the athlete is involved in. Approximately one third of class time.

Multi-Sport Training: Various cross-training activities and games designed to improve student’s overall athletic ability and game understanding. Approximately one third of class time.

Fitness: Agility, Power & Speed, Strength, Flexibility, Aerobic Fitness, Anaerobic Fitness, FMS Testing/Building. Approximately one third of class time.

Academic: Biomechanics, Sport Nutrition, Mental Skills, Goal Setting, Rules and Regulations, Possible Coaching Certification. Implemented throughout the year on a constant basis as part of lessons.

Grouping: Dependent on numbers registered

Prerequisite: Physical Education 8 & 9, Completion of Application Form

Active Living 11 & 12

On-Court: Skills, Strategies & Tactics, Touches on Ball, Competitive Drills (in-class leagues, standings, etc).

Academic: Biomechanics, Sport Nutrition, Mental Skills, Coaching Certification, Score-Keeping.

Fitness: FMS Testing/Building, Agility, Power & Speed, Strength, Flexibility, Aerobic Fitness, Anaerobic Fitness.

Multi-Sport: Varying Non-Basketball Games/Activities @ approximately 1:6 ratio.

Grouping: Grade 9/10 Boys, Grade 11/12 Boys, Grade 9-12 Girls, (dependent on numbers).

An elective course for students who wish to stay active through their senior years. This course will be ideal for students who plan on participating in Senior School Sport Teams, as the participation on a team will be taken into account towards the successful completion of the course.

During a school season of play, students involved in the team are expected to record and reflect upon their training and season. During the off-season, they are expected to participate in the course activities.

Through this course, there will be ample opportunities for leadership; students will develop and instruct lessons at the Wentworth Campus in specific sports, have opportunities to help coach younger teams, complete their NCCP Introduction to Competition Certification, and potentially basic refereeing for a specific sport.

This course will only be offered if there is sufficient enrollment.

Prerequisite: Physical Education 10

Fitness & Conditioning 11 & 12

The goal of Fitness and Conditioning (High Performance) is to help student athletes increase their individual level of fitness, develop an understanding of a variety of fitness programs and develop leadership qualities. Using the knowledge they have acquired in the first term the students will develop their own sport specific fitness program. Students must be willing to work extremely hard and in all weather conditions.

Prerequisite: Physical Education 10

Yoga 11 & 12

This course has been developed as an introduction to the practice of yoga; no previous experience is required. Combined with breath work, meditation and written reflections, the practice of yoga is challenging, fun and a great stress release. Students will learn holistic methods to cope with daily stresses and to support their overall physical and mental health. The course environment is exploratory, respectful and non-judgmental. Students will gain experience in drawing awareness to the effects of a yoga practice on their body, mind and breath. Yogis will also learn about the yoga tradition and its history, basic meditation and nutrition.

Prerequisite: None

Physical Education High Performance 11 & 12

Sport Specific Training: Skills, Strategies & Tactics specific to the major sport the athlete is involved in. Approximately one third of class time.

Multi-Sport Training: Various cross-training activities and games designed to improve student’s overall athletic ability and game understanding. Approximately one third of class time.

Fitness: Agility, Power & Speed, Strength, Flexibility, Aerobic Fitness, Anaerobic Fitness, FMS Testing/Building. Approximately one third of class time.

Academic: Biomechanics, Sport Nutrition, Mental Skills, Goal Setting, Rules and Regulations, Possible Coaching Certification. Implemented throughout the year on a constant basis as part of lessons.

Grouping: Dependent on numbers registered

Prerequisite: Physical Education 8, 9 & 10, Completion of Application Form